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    The first notes of Ed Sheeran's 'Shape of You' had just played when Gabriella Papadakis suddenly became aware that people were about to see a whole lot more of her shape than she had planned. The French ice dancer's glittering emerald costume at the Olympics had come unhooked at the neckline and later in the routine her left breast was exposed live on television. When the clasp became unhooked, the 22-year-old Papadakis was more worried about holding up her outfit than making sure her twizzles and rhumba were in sync. Her swinging short program with partner Guillaume Cizeron at the Pyeongchang Olympics was threatening to go down in history alongside Janet Jackson's infamous wardrobe malfunction during her halftime performance at the Super Bowl. 'I felt it right away and I prayed,' Papadakis said. 'That's about what I could do.' Somehow, the French couple kept things together through most of their Latin program, producing a score of 81.93 points Monday that left them second behind Canadian stars Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir. Not all the program, though. It was during the final element, when Papadakis leaned back in Cizeron's arms, that her costume rode upward to reveal her breast. The performance was being shown live on international television, and people immediately began posting screen-grabs of the incident on social media. 'Our coverage of ice dancing was live tonight. Once a competitor's brief wardrobe issue became evident, we purposely used wider camera shots and carefully selected replays to keep the issue obscured,' NBC said in a statement to The Associated Press. 'We have edited the video for all television encores and online replays.' It was the second wardrobe mishap during the skating program at the Pyeongchang Games. American-born ice dancer Yura Min, competing for South Korea, had the back of her costume come unclasped during her short program with partner Alex Gamelin in the team competition. Papadakis and Cizeron, considered the biggest threat to Virtue and Moir for gold, still managed to gain level-four marks for all their elements save their final straight line lift. That left the French duo less than two points behind their Canadian training partners on a packed leaderboard. It's unclear whether the judges docked the couple for the wardrobe issue. The rules state losing any part of a costume, even a hair clip, can lead to a one-point deduction. 'It's a little bit frustrating to know that it's not because of something that we did,' Cizeron said. 'It's just a costume issue, something as stupid as that, so it's a little bit disappointing.' Papadakis was nearly in tears as she approached reporters after the routine, which is required of any Olympic competitor after competition. But she was in better spirits an hour later, when she no doubt realized that her chance of a gold medal was still intact. 'It was pretty distracting, kind of my worst nightmare happening at the Olympics,' Papadakis said. 'I told myself, 'I don't have a choice. I have to keep going,' and that's what we did. I think we can be proud of ourselves being able to deliver a great performance with that happening.' ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and a sweeping reorganization proposed for its 70,000 employees. The evolving status quo at the agency responsible for more than 780,000 square miles (2 million square kilometers) of public lands, mostly in the West, has prompted praise from energy and mining companies and Republicans, who welcomed the departure from perceived heavy-handed regulation under President Barack Obama. But the changes have drawn increasingly sharp criticism from conservationists, Democrats and some agency employees. Under President Donald Trump, the critics say, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has curbed outside input into how land administered by the agency is used, and elevated corporate interests above the its duty to safeguard treasured sites. The differing views illustrate longstanding tensions over the multifaceted role of America's public lands — an amalgam of pristine wilderness retreats, recreational playgrounds and abundant energy reserves. A year into his tenure, Zinke, a former U.S. Navy SEAL and Montana congressman, has emerged as the point person for the administration's goal of American 'energy dominance.' He's targeted for elimination regulations perceived to hamper development of oil, natural gas and coal beneath public lands primarily in the West and Alaska. He's also sketched plans to realign the agency's bureaucracy, trimming 4,600 jobs — about 7 percent of its workforce —and proposing a massive overhaul that would move decision-making out of Washington, D.C. and relocate headquarters staff to Western states at a cost of $17.5 million. The intent is to delegate more power to personnel in the field who oversee activities ranging from mining, to livestock grazing to protecting endangered plants and animals. Zinke models himself as a modern-day embodiment of Theodore Roosevelt's conservation ethos, but laid out his reorganization vision to the agency employees via a 'fireside chat' video that evoked another president: Franklin Roosevelt. His actions have stirred dissent from both within and outside the agency — from his claim that one-third of Interior employees were disloyal to Trump, to a proposal to allow more drilling off America's coasts while carving out an exception for Florida at the request of its Republican governor, Rick Scott. Along with Zinke's full-throated promotion of the Trump administration's new agenda came the transfer of at least 35 senior Interior employees. Among them was Matthew Allen, who was demoted from his post as assistant director of communications at Interior's U.S. Bureau of Land Management. He's now in a newly created position, performing 'nonspecific duties' in an Interior branch that oversees offshore drilling. Allen filed a federal lawsuit in December challenging his reassignment as retaliation for his support of government transparency. 'There appears to be a collective effort to suppress information being shared with the public, the press and the Congress,' he said. At the agency's highest levels, 11 leadership positions remain vacant a year after Trump took office, including the directors of the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park Service. Panels such as the National Park System Advisory Board have languished, according to a letter submitted by members of the board who resigned last month. Board Chairman and former Alaska Gov. Tony Knowles, a Democrat, complained requests to engage with Zinke's team were ignored and members were concerned stewardship and protection of the parks was being pushed to the side. When the Park Service in October proposed increasing entrance fees at 17 of the most highly visited parks — from Arches and Grand Canyon to Yellowstone and Zion — the board wasn't consulted, said Carolyn Finney, a University of Kentucky geography professor who was among those who resigned. 'How do we make parks more accessible? It's cost,' Finney said. She said the fee increase would hinder the ability of a 'more diverse and wider group of the public to visit he park.' The board's charter had expired in December after it collected comments from more than 100 experts on how parks should deal with climate change, increase visitor diversity and protect wildlife. Zinke's associate deputy secretary, Todd Willens, called the resignations a 'political stunt' because another meeting was planned and because the agency was working to renew its charter. Similar action has been promised for idled advisory boards at the Bureau of Land Management. Under Trump, the charters for 22 state-level resource advisory councils — composed of local officials, business and environmental group representatives and others — had expired by the end of January. Some expired months ago and at least 14 remained expired as of Friday. Interior Department representatives did not respond to numerous requests for information on the status of the other councils. The councils make recommendations on activities that take place on public lands, such as whether off-road vehicles should be allowed in wildlife habitat or whether logging could help prevent wildfires. Zinke suspended the panels for five months in May as part of a review of more than 200 boards and advisory committees. Some had not met in years. Congressional Democrats objected, saying the move would stifle non-governmental views on how U.S.-owned land is used. Zinke spokeswoman Heather Swift said it was 'common practice' to periodically renew and refine the panels' charters. She said Zinke's vision for the agency was 'to manage public lands at the most local level possible' by making more decisions regionally. For example, she said Zinke wants to make sure hiking trails that start on land controlled by one agency division don't just end when they reach land controlled by another division. Oil and gas groups in particular have embraced the concept of change for an agency once seen as an obstacle to drilling. The withdrawal or cancellation of Obama-era rules on fracking and methane emissions from oil and gas exploration were positive first steps, they say. Next comes getting Interior staff on board, said Kathleen Sgamma with the Western Energy Alliance, which promotes giving oil and gas companies access to federal lands. U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva of Arizona, the House Natural Resources Committee's ranking Democrat, said Zinke's actions have made it easier to pollute federal lands and waters while giving special interest groups more influence. 'He's in over his head,' Grijalva said. ___ Follow Matthew Brown on Twitter at www.twitter.com/matthewbrownap .
  • Fergie tried something different with her national anthem at the NBA All-Star Game, and not everybody was cheering. The Black Eyed Peas singer's slow, bluesy rendition of 'The Star-Spangled Banner' on Sunday night wasn't particularly well received at Staples Center or on social media before the 67th edition of the NBA's annual showcase. A low chuckle rumbled through the sold-out arena after Fergie finished the first line of the song with a throaty growl on 'the dawn's early light.' Fans throughout the star-studded crowd reacted with varying levels of bemusement and enthusiasm while her languid, 2 ½-minute version of the song continued. Although Fergie was on pitch, her tempo, musical accompaniment and sexy delivery were not exactly typical for a sporting event or a patriotic song. Golden State All-Star Draymond Green captured the mood — and became an instant GIF — when he was shown open-mouthed on the scoreboard and the television broadcast in apparent confusion over the unique vocal stylings. Green then chuckled to himself after realizing he was on TV. After a forceful finish, Fergie finally got big cheers when she shouted, 'Let's play some basketball!' The Grammy Award-winning singer, born Stacy Ann Ferguson, is from nearby Hacienda Heights, California. Famed basketball commentator Charles Barkley joked that he 'needed a cigarette' after Fergie's performance during the TNT halftime show. Former Lakers star Shaquille O'Neal leaped to Fergie's defense, saying: 'Fergie, I love you. It was different. It was sexy. I liked it. Leave her alone.' Others on social media weren't as kind, with criticism of the performance outpacing the positive reviews. The Forum in nearby Inglewood, California, was the site of arguably the most famous national anthem in sports history during another NBA All-Star Game 35 years ago. Marvin Gaye's touching rhythm-and-blues version of 'The Star-Spangled Banner' at the 1983 game was initially criticized, but has since gained widespread acceptance as a groundbreaking musical performance. Instead, Fergie is more likely to join the long list of curious versions of the anthem, even though she showed far more impressive vocal chops than the likes of Roseanne Barr or Carl Lewis. ___ More AP basketball: www.apnews.com/tags/NBAbasketball
  • Lindsey Vonn is not planning to change her mind or stop saying what she thinks, no matter what attacks folks might send her way via social media. 'That's what bullies want you to do: They want to defeat you. And I'm not defeated. I'm the same. I stand by my values. And I'm not going to back down,' the 33-year-old American said Monday after turning in the third-fastest downhill training run. 'I may not be as vocal right now with my opinions, but that doesn't mean that they've won, you know? I haven't changed my mind.' Vonn, the 2010 Olympic downhill champion and owner of four overall World Cup titles, drew plenty of attention when she told CNN in an interview that aired in December that she would 'absolutely not' visit the White House if the U.S. Olympic team is invited after the Winter Games. 'I want to represent our country well,' she said then. 'I don't think that there are a lot of people currently in our government that do that.' Later, after a bit of backlash from some, she stood by what she said and told reporters at a World Cup race: 'I was asked my opinion and I gave it. I mean, it's not necessarily my place to be sticking my nose in politics, but as an athlete, I do have a voice.' When Vonn finished tied for sixth in her first event in South Korea, the super-G on Saturday, there were more hot takes on Twitter by people creating a link between her lack of a medal in that event to her earlier comments. 'Definitely, before the race I don't go on social media. I may post something, but I don't look at anything,' Vonn said Monday at Jeongseon Alpine Center, where the downhill race is scheduled for Wednesday. 'But I always try to remember that it's people talking behind the computer and they're going to say anything.' She said she isn't letting nasty comments prevent her from enjoying what she has said will be her final Olympics. 'There's, of course, going to be people that hate me and hope I ski off a cliff and die. But that's fine. I'm not going to do that,' Vonn said with a chuckle. 'And you know, I just take it for what it is. At some point, you have to laugh and say it's just completely ridiculous.' Vonn is considered the person to beat in the downhill. That's long been her best event, the one in which she's produced 42 of her women's-record 81 World Cup race wins, including three in a row heading into the Olympics. She also owns four downhill world championships medals, including a gold in 2009. Vonn has looked in top form in training, clocking Sunday's top time on the 1¾-mile (2.8-kilometer) course, before easing up and standing tall with arms spread at the finish on Monday. 'She is definitely the favorite,' said Italy's Sofia Goggia, who was second in training Monday, behind only Austria's Stephanie Venier, the runner-up at last year's world championships. There is more Alpine downhill training Tuesday. Pyeongchang Olympics giant slalom champion Mikaela Shiffrin was 16th-fastest Monday. She and Vonn are assured of being picked for the four-woman U.S. downhill team, and Alice McKennis earned a spot by having the best time of other contenders Monday, arriving ninth overall. Surprise super-G gold medalist Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic has not participated in either downhill training run and is expected to instead compete in her other sport, snowboarding, where qualifying for the parallel giant slalom is Thursday. ___ AP Sports Writer Pat Graham contributed to this report. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org/
  • Iran's Press TV is reporting that search and rescue teams have reached the site of the plane crash that authorities say killed all 65 people on board. The Aseman Airlines ATR-72, a twin-engine turboprop used for short-distance regional flying, went down on Sunday in foggy weather, crashing into Mount Dena in southern Iran. The TV says search teams reached the crash site before dawn on Monday. The station said the weather had improved and broadcast footage of a helicopter joining the search. Aseman Airlines said all on board Flight EP3704 were killed, including six crew members. The crash was yet another fatal aviation disaster for Iran, which for years was barred from buying necessary airplane parts due to Western sanctions over its contested nuclear program.
  • Japan has reported a trade deficit for January, its first in eight months, mainly due to seasonal factors. Customs data released Monday showed imports rose 8 percent from a year earlier to 7.03 trillion yen ($66 billion). Exports jumped 12 percent to 6.09 trillion yen ($57.1 billion), leaving a deficit of 943.4 billion yen ($8.8 billion). Exports to China jumped 30 percent from a year earlier. Japan's trade surplus with the U.S., its largest export market, fell 12 percent as exports edged higher while imports surged 9 percent. Shipments of machinery and vehicles accounted for the fastest growth in exports, while higher costs for oil and natural gas pushed imports higher. Economists attributed the switch to a global deficit mainly to the end of year and New Year holidays.
  • The Americans have done their part, playing their way back into the only women's hockey game that matters. Once again, they have a chance at the Olympic gold medal that has eluded the United States for two decades. The Americans are back in the title game for a third straight Olympics after shutting out Finland 5-0 on Monday in the semifinals. They will play the winner of the other semifinal between Canada and the 'Olympic Athletes from Russia' on Thursday, looking to win their first gold since 1998 when women's hockey made its debut in the Olympics. And yes, the Americans understand the United States-Canada playing for gold is what everyone expects to see. 'Definitely the rivalry has been there since I think I was born, so everyone's looking forward to that,' said 22-year-old Dani Cameranesi. This will be the third opportunity at gold for six Americans: captain Meghan Duggan, Hilary Knight, Gigi Marvin, Kacey Bellamy and twin sisters Monique Lamoureux-Morando and Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson. 'It's honestly a dream come true,' Knight said. 'This is the world's biggest stage. This is the game that you want. This is the game we've been dreaming of and to have another opportunity to get back here, it's huge.' Olympic newcomer Cameranesi scored two goals and added an assist to lead the Americans over Finland. Marvin started the scoring, and Lamoureux-Davidson and Knight both scored during a 5-on-3 34 seconds apart in the second period. Maddie Rooney made 14 saves for the shutout. Finland remains winless in eight games against the Americans at the Olympics. The Finns, ranked third in the world last year, will try to take home the bronze medal for the first time since 2010. 'We're got one thing on our mind, and that's to get a medal,' said goaltender Noora Raty, who made 33 saves. 'They're the best in the world (U.S. and Canada). We just need to get more girls involved so we have more to choose from.' The Americans opened these games a 2-1 loss to Canada wrapping up pool play. 'This was really a gold-medal preparation for us because they're a darn good team, and we had to be ready to play,' U.S. coach Robb Stauber said of Finland. The Americans wasted no time getting on the board. Captain Meghan Duggan found Marvin alone in the slot, and she beat Raty stick-side for the easy goal just 2:25 into the game. Finland lost defenseman when she had to be helped off the ice and to the locker room after a knee-on-knee collision with Duggan. She was knocked off balance before crashing face-first into the boards, snapping her head back. When play resumed without a penalty, some fans booed. Savolainen returned in the second period. Stauber said the referee immediately came over and said it was a collision. Duggan said she was really happy Savolainen got up and that any decision about a potential suspension was out of her control. 'There's been some other plays that haven't been put into question, and so I can't imagine that there would be any disciplinary action just based on other things that have been let go,' Duggan said. Cameranesi put the United States up 2-0 with 1:22 left in the period, taking the puck away from Susanna Tapani and skating into the left circle before beating Raty's blocker with a wrist shot top shelf. Lamoureux-Davidson's slap shot from the left circle came with 2 seconds left on the 5-on-3 at 13:21 of the second period, and Knight got her first goal of this tournament by redirecting a shot from Sidney Morin with 5 seconds left on the man advantage for the 4-0 lead. Cameranesi padded the lead as she scored from the slot over Raty's glove off a pass from Hannah Brandt. The Americans weren't quite ready to turn their attention to a specific opponent just yet. 'We're super excited to be in this position again,' Lamoureux-Davidson said. 'We worked four years to put ourselves in position to compete for a gold medal and we'll enjoy this for a little bit, but we know that this isn't what we came here for. We're ready to go to battle in a couple days.' ___ AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno and AP Sports Writer Jimmy Golen contributed to this report. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org ___ Follow Teresa M. Walker at www.twitter.com/teresamwalker
  • Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes on Monday. There were no fatalities or injuries from the morning eruption, the National Disaster Mitigation Agency said. The volcano, one of three currently erupting in Indonesia, was dormant for four centuries before exploding in 2010, killing two people. Another eruption in 2014 killed 16 people, while seven died in a 2016 eruption. Disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said hot ash clouds traveled as far as 4,900 meters southward. The regional volcanic ash advisory center in Darwin, Australia, issued a 'red notice' to airlines. Some 30,000 people have been forced to leave homes around the mountain in the past few years. Mount Sinabung is among more than 120 active volcanoes in Indonesia, which is prone to seismic upheaval due to its location on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin.
  • A 'Make America Great Again' hat. A tea party T-shirt. A MoveOn.org button. Wear any one of those items to vote in Minnesota, and a poll worker will likely ask you to remove it or cover it up. Like a number of states, Minnesota bars voters from wearing political items to the polls to reduce the potential for confrontations or voter intimidation. But that could change. The Supreme Court on Feb. 28 will consider a challenge to the state's law, in a case that could affect other states, too. Wen Fa, a lawyer with the Pacific Legal Foundation, the group behind the challenge to Minnesota's law, says voters wearing political apparel shouldn't have to hang up their hats, turn their T-shirts inside out or put their buttons in their bags just to cast a ballot. Wearing political clothing is 'a passive way to express core political values,' said Fa, who said the case is 'about the free speech rights of all Americans.' Minnesota sees it differently. In court papers, it says the law is a 'reasonable restriction' that preserves 'order and decorum in the polling place' and prevents 'voter confusion and intimidation.' 'I think what's important to understand is the purpose of this prohibition is to protect the fundamental right to vote,' said Daniel Rogan, who is arguing the case for the state and said he doesn't know of anyone issued a fine of up to $300 allowed under the law. Lower courts have sided with the state. Beyond Minnesota, state laws vary in their fashion policing of the polls. Some states allow voters to wear whatever they want. Others bar campaign clothing directly related to candidates or issues on the ballot. Minnesota has a broad law that also bans 'political' attire, including clothing promoting a group with understood political views, such as the tea party or MoveOn.org. The sides in the Supreme Court case disagree about which states have laws similar to Minnesota's, but each side's number is roughly 10. Elections officials in states with restrictions say it's not a big issue. Most people who wear prohibited items to the polls just aren't aware of the law or forget, officials say, and comply with requests to cover up. Will Senning, Vermont's elections director since 2013, said he can't remember any Election Day calls about people refusing to comply with his state's law. Elaine Manlove, who has headed elections in Delaware since 2007, couldn't think of a single prosecution under her state's statute nor could Mark Goins, who has overseen Tennessee elections since 2009. But Goins said he'd be concerned about allowing clothing supporting candidates or political parties at polling places. 'I think you run the risk of having political disputes inside the polling location and sometimes these disputes can get pretty loud,' Goins said. The Supreme Court last considered the issue of free speech at polling places in 1992 when the court upheld a Tennessee law prohibiting the display or distribution of campaign materials within 100 feet of a polling place. The case now before the justices began in 2010 when several groups sued after Minnesota officials made clear they wouldn't permit residents to vote while wearing tea party apparel or buttons that said, 'Please I.D. Me.' The buttons referred to legislation then under discussion in the state and ultimately defeated that would have required residents to show photo identification to vote. Two voters who defied elections officials — one who wore a 'Please I.D. Me' button and another who wore both a button and tea party T-shirt — were asked to cover up or remove the items. Both were ultimately allowed to vote wearing the apparel, though their names were taken down for potential prosecution. Andy Cilek, one of the voters confronted by poll workers, called the policy 'absurd.' Now, at the Supreme Court, Cilek's side has both the support of the libertarian Cato Institute and the liberal American Civil Liberties Union, and his lawyer believes the case is not one that will divide the court along ideological lines. 'The American electorate is surely hardy enough to vote their conscience even if they notice their fellow citizens wearing, say, a Black Lives Matter or AFL-CIO T-shirt, a Women's March hat, or a pro-life or peace-sign button,' the ACLU told the court in a brief. Texas resident Brett Mauthe agrees. In 2016, the Donald Trump supporter was arrested outside his polling place after he refused to cover up a black T-shirt he was wearing that said '50% basket of deplorables,' a reference to a comment Hillary Clinton had made about Trump supporters. He argued his shirt was ambiguous in its support. Mauthe, who didn't know about Texas' law when he went to vote and whose case was ultimately dismissed, says he's moved on. He's passionate about his politics, he said, but if given the opportunity to lawfully wear political clothing to the polls, 'I probably would just wear regular street clothes,' he said. ___ Follow Jessica Gresko on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jessicagresko
  • From the gold medalist down to the last-place finisher, what the women snowboarders really wanted was a do-over. On a day filled with sunshine, smiles and plenty of sick tricks, they got that — and made the most of it. The high-flying world of Big Air made its brash, high-flying debut at the Olympics on Monday, and by all accounts, it was a hit. 'Everyone showed their absolute best,' said Anna Gasser of Austria, who won the qualifying round and will jump last of the 12 riders in Friday's finals. 'And that's what we all needed after slopestyle.' Slopestyle was not pretty , and almost every rider agreed it should not have been contested last Monday, when shifting, whipping winds turned an already treacherous sport into something even more dangerous. Riders completed only nine of the 50 runs without a fall. Big Air, on the other hand, was great to watch. Twenty-six of the world's best riders made two jumps each — speeding down a 160-foot-long (50-meter) ramp to vault off a huge kicker and travel up to 100 feet (30 meters) below for the landing. Where slopestyle is about stringing together a succession of tricks for an entire run, Big Air is about who can throw the best single jump. Though there were no medals at stake in the qualifying round, many of the riders jumped as though there were. The bulk of the finalists needed 900-degree spins — the sort of tricks that often win Big Air contests — simply to advance to the medal round. 'Watching today, I'm just like, 'Yes. This is what's up,'' American Jamie Anderson said. Anderson won her second straight slopestyle gold medal last week with an efficient but wind-hampered run that came straight from the days of microfiche. Though she was one of the few who put on a brave face and tried to make the best of it, she was the first to concede the Olympic debut of Big Air showed her sport in a much better light. 'It was really unfortunate with the weather last week and not really being able to showcase how hard everyone has worked in the last handful of years,' Anderson said. 'But I think it was good fuel on the fire, because everyone is charging today.' Zoi Synnott Sadowski of New Zealand became the first woman to land a switchback 900 — in which she rode backward, took off backward and twisted for 2 ½ rotations — in competition. She finished fifth. Gasser, a favorite in this event, finished first in qualifying with a cab double-cork 1080, which is sometimes the trick she'll use to win a contest. Norway's Silje Norendal wobbled on the landing on both her cab 900s and squeaked into the final in the 10th spot; normally that trick, if landed at all, would have put her comfortably into a final. 'This is the craziest qualifier we've ever had,' said Norendal, who summed up the vibe at slopestyle a week earlier by admitting that all she wanted to do was stand at the top of the hill and cry. 'I'm just happy to be part of everything that's happening.' Though many of these riders prefer slopestyle because it showcases all their skills instead of just one, Norendal said Big Air has a way of bringing more people into the big circus tent that snowboarding has become, especially since it was brought, somewhat reluctantly, into the Olympics 20 years ago. 'Even if you fell, if you went big and you fell, they'd all go 'Whooooo,'' she said. 'That's pretty cool. That's all I want. I don't really need people to understand what we do, but just to enjoy it.' On this day — a day when the best women in snowboarding got back to showcasing their finest stuff — the fans weren't the only ones loving it. 'The tricks were amazing,' Gasser said. 'I was standing up there and I was like, 'This is so sick.'' ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org