ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

clear-night
75°
Clear
H 88° L 59°
  • clear-night
    75°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 88° L 59°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    77°
    Afternoon
    Cloudy. H 88° L 59°
  • clear-day Created with Sketch.
    79°
    Evening
    Sunny. H 83° L 61°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg news on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg traffic on demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Krmg weather on demand

00:00 | 00:00

News

    Australia plans to ban convicted pedophiles from traveling overseas in what the government said Tuesday is a world-first move to protect vulnerable children in Southeast Asia from exploitation. Australian pedophiles are notorious for taking inexpensive vacations to nearby Southeast Asian and Pacific island countries to abuse children there. Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said she would cancel the passports of around 20,000 pedophiles on the national child sex offender register under legislation that will be introduced to Parliament soon. 'There has been increasing community concern about sexual exploitation of vulnerable children and community concern is justified,' she told reporters. Almost 800 registered child sex offenders travelled overseas from Australia last year and about half went to Southeast Asian destinations, she said. 'There will be new legislation which will make Australia a world leader in protecting vulnerable children in our region from child sex tourism,' Bishop said. Justice Minister Michael Keenan said no country has such a travel ban. He said 2,500 new convicted pedophiles would be added to the sex offender register each year and would also lose their passports. The register contains 3,200 serious offenders who will be banned from travel for life. Less serious offenders drop off the register after several years of complying with reporting conditions and would become eligible to have their passports renewed. Independent Senator Derry Hinch, who was molested as a child and was jailed twice as a radio broadcaster for naming pedophiles in contravention of court orders, took credit for the government initiative. Hinch said he had not known that convicted pedophiles were allowed to travel before he received a letter from Australian actress and children's rights campaigner Rachel Griffiths soon after he was elected to the Senate last year. 'If we can take a passport from a bankrupt, why can't we stop our pedophiles from traveling to Myanmar?' Griffiths wrote. Under Australian law, a bankrupt person cannot travel overseas without a trustee's permission. Hinch, who was involved in drafting the legislation, said temporary passports could be provided to pedophiles who need to travel for legitimate business or family reasons, and for pedophiles living overseas who need to return to Australia as their visas expire. 'This will not apply to a teenager who has been caught sexting to his 15-year-old girlfriend,' said Hinch, referring to sexual phone communications. 'I know sometimes, I think unfairly, they go on registers, but we're trying to work it out so they don't,' he added. Bishop said governments in the Asia-Pacific region wanted Australia to do more to stem child sex tourists. 'There's most certainly deep concern among countries in our region about the number of registered child sex offenders in Australia engaging in the child sex tourism industry,' she said. Australia has attempted to crack down on Australian child sex tourists by adding a new criminal offense punishable by up to 25 years in prison for Australian citizens or residents who molest children overseas.
  • The first period of their first Stanley Cup Final game was a rough one for the Nashville Predators. They had a goal waved off. They fell behind 3-0 and looked overmatched at times. And then things settled down. Nashville dominated long stretches of the second and third periods, and even limited the defending Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins without a shot for an impressive 37-minute stretch before falling 5-3. Game 2 is Wednesday night. 'I thought we outplayed them, I really did,' Predators defenseman P.K. Subban said. 'Being down 3-0 to the Stanley Cup champions, coming back and tying it up with an opportunity to win the hockey game is definitely something to build on.' Ryan Ellis scored in the second period and Colton Sissons in the third, both on the power play, before Frederick Gaudreau tied the game prior to Jake Guentzel's game-winner for Pittsburgh. Pekka Rinne made seven saves on just 12 shots. He faced eight of those shots in the first period and then saw none in the second period, the first time a team held an opponent without a shot in a Stanley Cup Final since the league began tracking shots on goal in 1958. The next shot he faced was Guentzel's goal with 3:17 to play. 'At the end of the game, I'm disappointed I didn't help my team,' Rinne said. 'We showed a lot of character and I felt we played a great game. They're a very opportunistic team, a high-skilled team, and we have to limit our mistakes.' Nick Bonino scored twice, including and empty-net goal, while Evgeni Malkin and Conor Sheary scored in the first period for Pittsburgh. Matt Murray made 23 saves. The Predators were a perfect 3-0 on the road in Game 1 during the playoffs. But they allowed three goals in the first period for just the fourth time this season, and now they trail for the first time in the Stanley Cup playoffs. Nashville thought it scored the opening goal midway through the first period when Subban's wrist shot from the point got by Murray. But the goal was overturned and ruled offside after the first coach's challenge in a Final game. 'The impact of that moment and then the chain of events that happened after that with the penalty kills I think changed the course of the game,' Predators coach Peter Laviolette said. Pittsburgh was awarded a 5-on-3 power play for a full two minutes, and the Predators were less than 30 seconds from killing the penalty when Malkin's slap shot from the point beat Rinne. Sheary struck 1:05 after Malkin's goal, converting a wide-open look from the side of the net. And with just 16.1 seconds left in the first, Rinne poked Bonino's centering pass and the deflected puck bounced off Mattias Ekholm and into the goal. 'As bad as it seemed, we still found a way to get back into it,' Predators' captain Mike Fisher said. The Predators were hardly intimidated by the big stage. Nashville beat Chicago, the top seed in the conference, in a four-game sweep before taking down St. Louis and outlasting Anaheim. Pittsburgh owns a massive edge in Stanley Cup Final experience, 156 games to just five for the Predators, all by Fisher, while playing for Ottawa. But Nashville entered the Stanley Cup Final playing comfortably and confidently, poise that was on display during points of the second and third periods. Ellis scored a power-play goal through a Viktor Arvidsson screen midway through the second period, cutting the deficit to 3-1. The Predators continued to press and they were rewarded on the power play when Roman Josi's shot from the point changed direction and banked off Sissons' knee at the top of the crease and behind Murray. Nashville tied it with 6:31 to play when Gaudreau scored on a feed from Austin Watson, who beat two Penguins behind the net to set up the goal. From there, the Predators were rolling, with all the momentum from their three-goal comeback. Guentzel's shot changed everything. 'It just wasn't our night,' Fisher said. 'We just have to stay positive. We'll regroup.
  • A Navy SEAL who fell to his death when his parachute failed to open during a Fleet Week demonstration over the Hudson River has been identified as a 27-year-old Colorado man. The accident that killed Remington J. Peters occurred Sunday at Liberty State Park, a large New Jersey park across from Manhattan where people catch ferries to see the Statue of Liberty. Peters, whose identity was revealed late Monday, was a member of an elite Navy parachute team called the Leap Frogs. He was a role model who will be 'painfully missed,' his family said in a statement released by the U.S. Navy. 'He was an angel on earth and role model to all,' the statement said. 'We couldn't have been more proud of him. He lived life to the fullest and taught us to do the same.' The cause of the parachute malfunction that killed Peters is under investigation. Peters was among four parachutists who drifted down from two helicopters. The Navy said he was pulled from the water by the U.S. Coast Guard. His parachute landed in a parking lot. The Navy Region Mid-Atlantic commander, Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, asked for prayers 'for the Navy SEAL community.
  • This is what the Pittsburgh Penguins do. They find a way. Even on nights when they blow a three-goal lead, they go an entire period (and then some) without registering a single shot and the opponent is fresher, quicker and, for long stretches, demonstrably better. Maybe it's mystique. Maybe it's luck. Maybe it's a bit of both. What makes the defending Stanley Cup champions different from the 29 other clubs chasing them isn't the way they dominate when they play well. It's their ability to survive when they don't. On nights like Monday in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, when a brief early flurry led to a baffling lull only to end how so many games have ended for the Penguins over the last two springs: with the bigger number on the scoreboard next to their name and the guys on the other bench wondering how Pittsburgh got away. Again. Rookie Jake Guentzel fired a shot by Nashville's Pekka Rinne with 3:17 left in regulation to put the Penguins head to stay in a flat-out weird 5-3 victory. 'None of us in our dressing room is fooled by the score tonight,' Pittsburgh coach Mike Sullivan said. Game 2 is Wednesday night in Pittsburgh. The Penguins were outshot 26-12 and went 37 minutes without managing to get one puck on Rinne, the best goalie in the playoffs and the main reason the Predators are on their sport's biggest stage for the first time. And yet it didn't matter. When Guentzel ended an eight-game goalless drought and Nick Bonino picked up his second goal on an empty-netter , the Penguins were in control as they try to become the first team since Detroit in 1998 to win back-to-back Cups. 'It's not textbook,' said Pittsburgh captain Sidney Crosby, who picked up two assists. 'We've got some things we need to improve on.' The Penguins will have the luxury of doing it with the lead. Conor Sheary scored his first of the playoffs and Evgeni Malkin collected his eighth . The Penguins won despite putting just 12 shots on goal. Matt Murray finished with 23 saves for the Penguins, who used the first coach's challenge in Final history to wipe out an early Nashville goal and held on despite their astonishing shot drought. 'I think at the end of the day we're up 1-0,' Bonino said. 'We had a good first, we had a terrible second and we were terrible in the third. I don't think it's Xs and Os. We've got to work harder, compete a little harder, but we got some timely goals.' Ryan Ellis, Colton Sissons and Frederick Gaudreau scored for the Predators. Rinne stopped just seven shots. 'It was a different game,' Rinne said. 'I can't remember facing that kind of game before.' The Penguins had all of three days to get ready for the final following a draining slog through the Eastern Conference that included a pair of Game 7 victories, the second a double-overtime thriller against Ottawa last Thursday. Maybe, but the Penguins looked a step behind at the outset. The Predators, who crashed the NHL's biggest stage for the first time behind Rinne and a group of talented defenseman, were hardly intimidated by the stakes, the crowd or the defending champions, trying to become the first repeat winner since Detroit in 1998. All the guys from 'Smashville' have to show for it is their first deficit of the playoffs on a night a fan threw a catfish onto the ice to try and give the Predators a taste of home. 'I thought our guys played a great game,' Nashville coach Peter Laviolette said. 'We hate the score. We hate the result but we'll move forward.' Nashville was better from the opening faceoff but Pittsburgh managed to build a quick 3-0 lead anyway thanks to a fortunate bounce and some quick thinking by Penguins video coordinator Andy Saucier. Part of his job title is to alert coach Mike Sullivan when to challenge a call. The moment came 12:47 into the first when P.K. Subban sent a slap shot by Murray that appeared to give the Predators the lead. Sullivan used his coach's challenge, arguing Nashville forward Filip Forsberg was offside. A lengthy review indicated Forsberg's right skate was in the air as he brought the puck into a zone, a no-no. 'The impact of that moment and then the chain of events that happened after that with the penalty kills I think changed the course of the game,' Laviolette said. The decision gave the Penguins all the wiggle room they needed to take charge. Malkin scored on a 5-on-3 15:32 into the first, Sheary's first of the playoffs made it 2-0 just 65 seconds later and when Bonino's innocent centering pass smacked off Nashville defenseman Mattias Ekholm's left knee and by Rinne just 17 seconds before the end of the period, Pittsburgh was in full command. It looked like a repeat of Game 5 of the Eastern Conference finals against Ottawa, when the Penguins poured in four goals in the first period of a 7-0 rout. Nashville, unlike the Senators, didn't bail. They haven't at any point during their remarkable run. Why start now? Ellis scored the first goal by a Predator in a Stanley Cup Final 8:21 into the second and Nashville kept Rinne downright bored at the other end. Pittsburgh didn't manage a shot on net in the second period, the first time it's happened in a playoff game in franchise history — and the first such period by any team in a Final game since the NHL began tracking shots on goal in 1958. Nashville kept coming. Sissons beat Murray 10:06 into the third and Gaudreau tied it just after a fruitless Pittsburgh power play. No matter. The Penguins have become chameleons under Sullivan. They can win with both firepower and precision. Guentzel slipped one by Rinne with 3:17 to go in regulation and Bonino added an empty netter to give Pittsburgh early control of the series. 'We didn't do a great job of (shooting), but we made them count,' Crosby said. 'But it was a good finish there to get that one from Jake.' ___ More AP NHL: http://apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey ___ This story has been corrected to show Penguins shot drought was 37 minutes.
  • Quick facts: Police are searching for a suspect after an incident near a Tulsa elementary school. They say a suspect is on foot in the area near Briarglen Elementary School near 31st Street and 129th East Avenue. Police say someone in a black, four-door Ford truck tried to sell a teen a phone and then beat him up, stealing several items from the teen and his grandmother, including passports, phones, wallet and a purse. Officers say the grandmother stepped in to try to help, but the suspects still beat up the teen. The teen, who is from Columbia, reportedly found an ad to buy the phone via Facebook. Police then set up a perimeter near there. They say a driver in the area took off from the scene, prompting a chase. Officers believe that teenaged driver was connected to the robbery. He was taken into custody. Investigators say the robbery could be connected to a north Tulsa home invasion. Watch the video above for more details Trending Now on FOX23 DUI suspect allegedly jumps off bridge to escape police  Bank forecloses on ‘Extreme Makeover' homeowner in Michigan Family of Tulsa shooting victim turns to faith to find forgiveness Woman shopped at Wal-Mart while children 2, 5, locked in trunk, police say 4 children, mother kidnapped at gunpoint found, police still searching for suspect Memorial Day: Quotes about Patriotism and FreedomWatch: Military Memorial Sites
  • Drilled in the hip by a heater, Bryce Harper knew where this was headed. In a hurry, too. 'You see red,' he said. Enraged, the Washington slugger charged the mound, wildly fired his helmet and traded punches to the head with reliever Hunter Strickland, setting off a furious brawl Monday during the Nationals' 3-0 win over the San Francisco Giants. 'You never want to get suspended or anything like, but sometimes you just got to go and get them and can't hesitate,' Harper said. 'You either go to first base or you go after him and I decided to go after him.' The two players have a history, stemming from two home runs Harper hit off Strickland in the 2014 playoffs. 'I can see how that stands in people's minds,' Strickland said. This flashpoint came in their first matchup since then — with two outs in the eighth inning, none on and Washington ahead 2-0, Strickland hit Harper with the first pitch, a 98 mph fastball. Harper didn't wait. The four-time All-Star pointed his bat at Strickland, yelled at him and took off. 'My head was on a swivel, as quick as I could to not get taken out by somebody on their team or anything like that,' he said. No one got in Harper's way as he rushed the mound. Giants star catcher Buster Posey stuck near the plate when Harper bolted, and stayed clear of the fracas as things escalated. 'Strick and him are the only ones that can answer why' the fight happened, Posey said. Posey got a concussion last month from a beaning. He said he wasn't thinking about that accident, but was concerned about injuries. 'There were some big guys tumbling around out there,' he said. 'So it was a little dangerous to get in there sometimes.' Harper's eyes were wide as he flung his helmet — it wasn't close to Strickland, it might've slipped, helmets are hard to throw accurately — and they started swinging away. The 6-foot-4 Strickland hit Harper in the face, then they broke apart for a moment before squaring off again. Harper punched Strickland in the head as the benches and bullpen emptied. 'I was trying to go after him, with the helmet or with myself, just doing what I needed to do keep it going, I guess,' Harper said. Giants teammates Michael Morse and Jeff Samardzija collided hard as they tried to get between the two fighters. 'I'm OK, but why is that news?' Morse said. 'I was trying to get in there to break everyone up.' Three Giants players forcefully dragged Strickland from the middle of the pack all the way into the dugout, while a teammate held back Harper. Harper and Strickland were both ejected, and are certain to face punishment from Major League Baseball. No injuries were reported in either clubhouse. Harper attributed a scratch to Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon pulling him away from the brawl. In the 2014 NL Division Series, Harper hit two home runs off Strickland. Harper watched the second shot sail down the line, in Game 4, and glared at the reliever as he rounded the bases. 'I wasn't sure what was going on, but I think (the Giants) were definitely shocked at the situation, shocked that he would do something like that three years later,' Harper said. 'It just wasn't relevant. Like I said, it was three years ago, over a thousand days, I guess,' Harper said. 'I don't know why he's thinking about it. He's got a World Series ring. It's on his finger and he's able to look at it every single night.' Angry, Harper did at least appreciate there was no head-hunting. 'One thing I've got to say about Strickland is he hit me in the right spot, so I do respect him for that,' Harper said. 'He didn't come up and in toward my face like some guys do, so I respect him on that level.' Strickland said he missed his spot. 'I left the ball over the plate a couple of times to him,' he said. 'He's taken advantage of that, so I went inside. Obviously, I got in a little too far.' 'He decided to come out, that's what he decided to do. It's go time. You protect yourself and stand your own ground,' he said. 'And I'll take what consequences come with it. I was pretty fired up, to be honest. It's part of the game.' Giants manager Bruce Bochy framed it for everyone. 'It looks bad, it does,' he said. 'Harper gets hit and you look at a guy who's given up some home runs, and he'll tell you that he was trying to come in. You don't want to make a mistake there. You have two guys who don't care for each other too much. It was a pretty good pile.' Nationals manager Dusty Baker had no doubt about Strickland's intent. 'We were ahead 2-0, two outs and nobody on base. I mean, that's the prime time to hit somebody if you're going to hit them, it looked like it was intentional to me,' he said. 'What's a man supposed to do? He's not a punching bag, he's human with emotions. I know he took (Strickland) deep in the playoffs a couple of times and he probably took exception to that. I mean baseball is a game where you don't forget and you can hold grudges for a long, long time.' Too long in the estimation of Harper and his teammates. 'Completely uncalled for,' Nationals second baseman Daniel Murphy said. 'Bryce hits one ... off him in a big spot from what I understand, I think I remember seeing it live, and Hunter waits three years. I think if the Giants thought it was that egregious, Bryce would've gotten one the next season.' Nationals outfielder Jayson Werth, Harper's teammate in 2014, said the incident shouldn't come as that big a surprise. 'You can't assume what other people are thinking or what other people are going to do,' he said. 'History is history, some people hold it longer than others.' Tanner Roark (5-2) struck out six and allowed six hits in seven innings. Koda Glover pitched a scoreless ninth to notch his sixth save. Ryan Zimmerman hit his 14th homer, off Matt Moore (2-6). Murphy hit an RBI double in his first game after missing three games due to illness. UP NEXT LHP Gio Gonzalez (3-1, 2.90 ERA) is 4-4 with a 2.94 ERA in 11 starts against the Giants. Samardzija (1-6, 4.50) is 2-5 with a 3.83 ERA in 14 appearances (seven starts) against Washington and 0-3 with a 4.50 ERA in his last three starts against the Nationals.
  • As an irate Bryce Harper charged toward the mound , Buster Posey just stood and watched from behind home plate. And when the Washington Nationals and San Francisco Giants cleared their benches Monday and punches flew both ways, the All-Star catcher did his best to remain just outside the fray. Not where some expected to find the Giants team leader with his pitcher, Hunter Strickland, exchanging head shots with Harper. 'Posey did NOTHING to stop Harper from getting to his pitcher,' former major league pitcher Dontrelle Willis wrote on Twitter. 'I've never seen that before in my life.' Posey declined to enter the fracas, instead remaining around its edges and watching as the players scuffled in 'a pretty good pile,' as Giants manager Bruce Bochy called it. Posey dealt with a concussion in April after being struck in the head by a pitch, but did not say he held back because of concerns related to that. He did say he was wary about the risk of injury. 'There were some big guys tumbling around out there,' Posey said. 'You see Mike Morse and Jeff Samardzija are about as big as they come and he was getting knocked around like a pinball. So it was a little dangerous to get in there.' Still, social media was abuzz at the sight of Posey not sticking up for his teammate. 'Strickland must have told @BusterPosey he was hitting him and let him come cause he didn't even give a soft jog,' Willis wrote. 'Says all you need to know that Buster Posey didn't bother to hold back Harper,' tweeted Fox broadcaster Kevin Burkhardt . 'Let him go get his pitcher.' Also absent from the fight: hard-nosed Giants ace Madison Bumgarner. As his teammates flew over the dugout railing, Bumgarner stayed put, perhaps because the left-hander is still recovering after injuring his pitching shoulder and ribs in a dirt biking accident in April. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • He died Sunday in Key West, Florida, his family said Monday. Deford was a six-time Sports Writer of the Year and a member of the National Association of Sportscasters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame. He wrote and spoke with a lyrical touch and this month retired from NPR's 'Morning Edition' after 37 years as a contributor. 'Frank was dealing with an audience that doesn't turn to the sports pages first thing,' said Tom Goldman, an NPR sports correspondent who recently spent time with Deford in Key West. 'And he was proudest of the many comments he got over the years from people saying, 'I don't really like sports, but I like what you did, and you made me more interested in it.'' He was the first sports writer awarded the National Humanities Medal. In 2013, President Barack Obama honored him for 'transforming how we think about sports.' 'A dedicated writer and storyteller, Mr. Deford has offered a consistent, compelling voice in print and on radio, reaching beyond scores and statistics to reveal the humanity woven into the games we love,' Obama said at the time. Deford called the award the one he is most proud of. His long profiles, covering all corners of sports, were for years a showcase in Sports Illustrated. 'He could watch the grittiest game and zoom in on the moment that made it important,' said Jim Litke, a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. 'Nobody was better at connecting sports to the culture at large. He dressed up every event he attended.' He also dressed up in a more literal way, always sharply attired and cutting a debonair figure at 6-foot-4 with his shock of dark hair and thin mustache. Deford was a prolific book author, including several novels, and contributed commentaries to HBO's 'Real Sports' program and hosted documentaries on the cable network. Among Deford's books were 'Heart of a Champion,' which chronicles the career of athletes who appeared on Wheaties boxes, and a biography of tennis great Bill Tilden. His wit always was on display. Among Deford's gems: 'I believe that professional wrestling is clean and everything else in the world is fixed.' And he understood why the games have such a hold on so many. 'To see the glory in sport, where somebody comes from behind and does something, sinks a shot in the last second or throws a touchdown pass or hits a home run, there is a beauty in that, and at the end of the day, that's why we love sports more than anything else.' Deford grew up in Baltimore and graduated from Princeton. He joined HBO Sports in 1995 and his first report chronicled life in Augusta, Georgia, outside the Masters. It was called 'The American Singapore.' He delivered 119 segments for the show and was a feature reporter at Wimbledon in the 1990s. He was editor-in-chief of The National, the nation's first sports daily that was founded in 1990 and folded the following year. Its final front page read: 'We Had A Ball: The fat lady sings our song.' Bryant Gumbel, host of 'Real Sports,' said Deford joked with him a week ago about finally being released from the hospital. 'In addition to being an immense talent, he was a consummate gentleman, a dear friend, and a beloved, original member of our 'Real Sports' family,' Gumbel said. 'Frank was a giant in the world of sports. His loss is immeasurable.' Deford is survived by his wife, the former model Carol Penner; two children; and two grandchildren.
  • A suspect in the poisoning death of the North Korean leader's half brother has written to her parents from jail, asking them to pray for her but saying 'don't think about me too much.' Siti Aisyah, an Indonesian, appeared in court Tuesday along with a second suspect, Doan Thi Huong of Vietnam. Their case was formally transferred to the High Court as the lower court had no jurisdiction to hear a murder case. The two women are accused of smearing VX nerve agent on Kim Jong Nam's face at the Kuala Lumpur airport on Feb. 13. Kim died soon afterward. The women have said they were duped into thinking they were playing a harmless prank for a hidden-camera show. Yusron Ambary, counsellor at the Indonesian Embassy, said Siti wrote a letter to her parents recently, asking them not to worry about her. 'I am in good health. Just pray. Don't think about me too much. Keep healthy and pray at night. I have a lot of people helping me. The embassy officials always come to see me, my lawyers also. Don't worry. Pray for me so that the case will be over soon and I can go back home. Send my love to my son Rio,' he read from the letter to reporters outside the courtroom. Armed escorts accompanied the women, who smiled at their embassy representatives as they were brought to the dock. Prosecutor Iskandar Ahmad said the date for their first appearance in the High Court would usually be within a month. The suspects would then enter pleas and the trial would have to start within 90 days, Iskandar said. Police have said four North Korean suspects fled Malaysia the day of the attack. Defense lawyers fear the women will be scapegoats because other people believed to have knowledge of the case left the country. Although Malaysia never directly accused North Korea of carrying out the attack, speculation is rampant that Pyongyang orchestrated a hit on a long-exiled member of its ruling elite. Although Kim, who was estranged from his family, was not an obvious political threat, he may have been seen as a potential rival in the country's dynastic dictatorship. North Korea has denounced such speculation.
  • ___ BASEBRAWL Nationals slugger Bryce Harper and Giants reliever Hunter Strickland are certain to soon get penalized by Major League Baseball after their fight in San Francisco. Hit in the hip by a 98 mph heater, Harper charged the mound, flung his helmet and traded punches to the head with Strickland. They both were ejected, but no injuries were reported after the benches and bullpens emptied. They had not faced each other since Harper hit two home runs off Strickland in the 2014 NL playoffs. 'You never want to get suspended or anything like, but sometimes you just got to go and get them and can't hesitate,' Harper said. 'You either go to first base or you go after him and I decided to go after him.' TROUT DOUBT Angels star Mike Trout has opted to have surgery for a torn ligament in his left thumb. The two-time AL MVP was hurt Sunday making a headfirst slide on a stolen base in Miami. Trout has been put on the disabled list for the first time in his career, and surgery Wednesday will sideline him for six to eight weeks. The 25-year-old outfielder is hitting .337 with 16 home runs. CAUSE FOR CONCERN Dustin Pedroia is heading back to Boston to get tests after the second baseman injured his left wrist stopping a fall on a close play. He tumbled over White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu, who lunged to tag the bag on Pedroia's grounder. The Red Sox are calling it a sprain, but manager John Farrell was uncertain about the severity. 'It's hard to say right now, and I think until we get the information, we'll know more then,' Farrell said. 'But I think anytime you're dealing with a position player's wrist, a hitter's wrist, that's always cause for concern.' SOX SALUTE A day after receiving a warm welcome back in his old home, Red Sox ace Chris Sale will make his first start against the Chicago White Sox since being traded away over the offseason. The White Sox saluted Sale with a highlight video during the first inning Monday, and the pitcher waved to the cheering crowd, pointed to the home dugout and patted his heart. 'I had a lot of good times here — a lot of friends still over there,' Sale said. Sale (5-2, 2.34) will square off with Jose Quintana (2-6, 4.82), who has struggled atop Chicago's rotation in Sale's absence. GOING PLACES The Astros have baseball's best record, and that's no surprise to manager A.J. Hinch. 'I didn't put any limitations on this team,' Hinch said. 'So I don't really have a baseline of how many games I expected to win.' Houston won its fifth in a row and improved to 36-16 by overcoming a six-run deficit with an 11-run eighth inning Monday, beating Minnesota 16-8. This, star shortstop Carlos Correa says, is exactly what he envisioned entering the year. 'We've got a lot of talent in this room,' he said. 'I feel like everywhere you look in the lineup there's talent, there's potential and we've got leadership now in this clubhouse. So we're heading somewhere.' HAPPY BIRTHDAY A day after turning 27, right-hander Tyler Pill makes his first major league start for the Mets, at home against the surprising NL Central-leading Brewers. 'It will definitely be exciting,' he said. 'I'm really looking forward to it.' Pill was called up from the minors Friday and lost in relief during his big league debut the following night at Pittsburgh when he gave up the winning run in the 10th inning. He was a combined 4-1 with a 1.60 ERA in nine starts at Triple-A and Double-A.