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Entertainment

    Saturday Night Live' alum Colin Quinn is exercising his wit days after a heart attack interrupted his busy touring schedule. The 58-year-old Quinn took to Twitter on Monday to let friends and foes alike know he's 'starting a list of those who didn't 'check in' yet,' five days after his Valentine's Day health emergency. The deep-thinking comic thanks the doctors and nurses at his New York hospital, saying they 'realized they had a precious jewel of comedy in their hands.' Quinn announced his heart attack last week, saying on Twitter his heart broke on Valentine's Day, 'literally.' He said he was doing well but if he dropped dead 'you would see a funeral like Al Capone!' He says the attack made him reflect, realizing 'we aren't guaranteed tomorrow.
  • Highlights from media coverage of the Pyeongchang Olympics: RATINGS: It was a comparatively slow Sunday for Olympic content, with an average of 18.2 million watching on NBC, NBCSN or through streaming services in prime time. That's down 15 percent from Sochi four years ago; the NBC-only telecast was down 23 percent. Saturday was the least-watched night of the Olympics so far, with 16.1 million viewers on NBC, NBCSN and streaming services, although that was down only 6 percent from Sochi. Viewership has largely exceeded expectations for the first half of the Olympics, but interest tends to dwindle in the second week. WARDROBE MALFUNCTION: The Olympics already have had more wardrobe malfunctions than a Super Bowl halftime show. You could see a replay of ice dancer Gabriella Papadakis ' routine on NBC's website on Monday, but only to a point. The French skater suffered a wardrobe malfunction on live TV late Sunday, when her costume top became unhooked, briefly exposing her left breast. She and partner Guillaume Cizeron directed much of their energy during the routine to trying to keep her outfit from flying open. In showing replays, NBC blurred out portions of the routine where Papadakis was more visible than she wanted to be. LAST LAUGH: NBC baffled some viewers Sunday by showing extended coverage of meaningless training runs by downhill skiers. The Nielsen company gave a window into NBC's thinking: The night's viewership peaked at 20.7 million when America's skiing sweethearts, Lindsey Vonn and Mikaela Shiffrin, were on the mountain. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Michael Fabiano was singing at the Metropolitan Opera when a key mix-up occurred. The tenor began Rodolfo's famous first act aria in Puccini's 'La Boheme' on Friday night when it became clear the orchestra was playing in a different key under conductor Marco Armiliato. 'I said, oh, no, they can't be doing this,' Fabiano recalled on Monday. The Met is presenting Franco Zeffirelli's 1981 production 15 times this season with four different lead tenors. When Russell Thomas sang the role in October and November, he opted for a version of 'Che gelida manina! (How cold your little hand is!)' that was one half tone down and finished with a top B natural, as opposed to the original key which ends in a top C, the Met music staff said. Puccini wrote both versions, and Fabiano prefers the higher key. 'The brilliance of the whole aria is lost in the transposition,' Fabiano said. 'When you sing in the lower key, the whole aria becomes fatter.' But the orchestra's sheet music never got changed for the resumption of the run last week. Fabiano glanced at the podium when that became apparent. 'We took a look at each other, like, what can we do now?' Armiliato said. The tenor kept on going, but the mix-up was noticeable enough to prompt comments on the Opera-L chat room. 'Once you're on the new train track, there's no way to stop, have a timeout on the football field and confer,' Fabiano said. The Met said the parts will be restored to the original key for the remaining performances. Fabiano took solace at one aspect of the mix-up. 'It's better to be down than up, I'll tell you that,' he said.
  • The Rev. Jesse Jackson said on Monday he's deeply insulted by a Fox News host's 'attack' on Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James and thanked the basketball All-Star for standing up for what he believes in. Political commentator Laura Ingraham criticized the three-time NBA champion for his recent comments about social issues, suggesting he should 'shut up and dribble.' James has vowed he won't do that, saying he'll continue to 'talk about what's really important.' Jackson said it's important for James, Golden State Warriors teammates Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry and other NBA players to keep speaking out against injustice and the behavior of President Donald Trump. 'No one told David to just play his harp and not stand up for his people,' Jackson said by telephone from Chicago on Monday. 'No one told Samson just lift weights and not challenge the Philistines. They told Jackie Robinson, 'Just play baseball.' He told them, 'I'm a man with dignity first.' They told Dr. King, 'Go be confined to the pulpit.' He said, 'I must speak peace to a troubled world.' In that tradition, King James, LeBron, his slam dunk for justice is needed. We thank him.' Jackson, who founded the two nonprofit organizations that merged to become Rainbow/PUSH, said it's star athletes' duty to speak up when confronted with inequity or wrongdoing. 'When Trump is attacking the FBI and covering up for the KGB,' Jackson said, 'LeBron's voice is needed.' The Republican president has repeatedly slammed the FBI, tweeting that its reputation was in 'tatters' and suggesting it failed to stop a Florida school shooting massacre because it was fixated on investigating allegations Russia meddled in the 2016 election. Jackson disclosed last year he has Parkinson's disease. He said on Monday he's doing 'very well.
  • It’s been “a beautiful day in this neighborhood” for 50 years. Feb. 19, 1968, was the day that PBS aired the first episode of “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood,” and the lessons that Fred Rogers taught still resonate today. A re-imagined tales of “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,” several televised tributes and even a feature-length movie remind us of the legacy of Mr. Rogers.  According to his official biography from the foundation that carries on his mission of education, Rogers was born in 1928 in the small town of Latrobe, Penn., east of Pittsburgh. After getting a degree in music composition, he was hired by NBC in New York as an assistant producer and eventually a floor director for some of the network’s programming in the ’50s. History was made in 1953 when WQED in Pittsburgh asked Rogers to come up with their first schedule. He produced a show called “The Children’s Corner,” where he  introduced characters such as Daniel Striped Tiger, X the Owl and Henrietta Pussycat. Those characters have found new life on “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,” where children now learn those positive messages not in puppet form, but from cartoons.  Fred Rogers’ belief in kindness led him to seminary, where he was ordained as a Presbyterian minister. Instead of moving toward a traditional religious calling, his charge was “to continue his work with children and families through the mass media.” In 1963, he was offered the opportunity to start a show in Canada called “Misterogers.” Three years later, he went back to Pittsburgh and created a new show called “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” which went national 50 years ago, on what would become PBS. Fred Rogers died on Feb. 27, 2003, in Pittsburgh and was survived by his wife, Joanne, and their two sons and three grandsons. >> Read more trending news  Rogers’ message of love and kindness still resonates today. When there is a national tragedy, memes or video clips of Fred Rogers telling children and adults alike to “look for the helpers” gives those who need it a moment of reassurance that everything will be OK. “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood” also helped launch the careers of some current stars.  Actress Ming-Na Wen, known for her role as Agent Melinda May on “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and as the voice of Disney’s Mulan, appeared on the show. Bill Nye the Science Guy appeared on an episode in 1997 to help everyone’s neighbor perform an experiment, Entertainment Weekly reported. Rogers also introduced kids to various genres of music, thanks to guest stars who dropped by, including Wynton Marsalis, Yo-Yo Ma and Tony Bennett, Entertainment Weekly reported. Michael Keaton, who went by his original name at the time, Michael Douglas, had one of his first jobs working as a stagehand on the show. He helped operate the iconic trolley, CBS News reported. He was also one of the “Flying Zookeeni Brothers,” Parade reported. Keaton will host a one-night-only PBS special that pays tribute to Rogers on March 6. “Mister Rogers, It’s You I Like” will feature Keaton and cast regulars, including Joe Negri, who portrayed Handyman Negri, and David Newell, who portrayed Mr. McFeely. Rogers will also be remembered by guests Judd Apatow, Whoopi Goldberg and Sarah Silverman, according to PBS. But that’s not the only remembrance planned for Mr. Rogers. Starting on Feb. 26, PBS Kids will run a weeklong tribute to Rogers, PBS announced.  A forever stamp will also honor Rogers this year and is scheduled to be released on March 23, WPXI reported. And a biopic has been announced in which Tom Hanks has been slated to star as Rogers.
  • Bold. Visionary. A spectacular success. The words in an online promotion for a new museum exhibit in Washington, D.C., describe an 1830 U.S. law that forced thousands of American Indians from their lands in the South to areas west of the Mississippi River. Provocative, yes, says the co-curator of the exhibit 'Americans' that opened last month at the National Museum of the American Indian. Bold and visionary in imagining a country free of American Indians. A spectacular success in greatly expanding wealth from cotton fields where millions of blacks worked as slaves. 'When you're in the show, you understand bold and visionary become tongue in cheek,' co-curator Cecile Ganteaume said. The exhibit that runs through 2022 has opened to good reviews and pushes the national debate over American Indian imagery — including men in headdresses with bows, arrows and tomahawks — and sports teams named the Chiefs, Braves and Blackhawks. The NFL's Washington Redskins logo on one wall prompts visitors to think about why it's described both as a unifying force in D.C. and offensive. The exhibit falls short, some say, with an accompanying website and its characterization of the Indian Removal Act. The online text is a perplexing way to characterize an effort that spanned multiple presidencies and at one point, consumed one-fifth of the federal budget, said Ben Barnes, second chief of the Shawnee Tribe. The law led to the deaths of thousands of people who were marched from their homes without full compensation for the value of the land they left behind. And it affected far more tribes than the five highlighted online, he said. 'It made it seem like it was a trivial matter that turned out best for everyone,' he said. 'I cannot imagine an exhibit at the newly established African-American museum that talked about how economically wonderful slavery was for the South.' Ganteaume said the website isn't encyclopedic and neither it nor the exhibit is meant to dismiss the experiences of American Indians. Instead, it challenges the depths at which people recognize indigenous people are ingrained in America's identity and learn how it happened, she said. An opening gallery has hundreds of images of American Indians — often a stoic chief in a Plains-style headdress or a maiden — on alcohol bottles, a sugar bag, motor oil, a missile mounted on the wall and a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle. Dozens of clips expand on how the imagery has permeated American culture in television and film. But when historic or cartoonish images are the only perception people have of what it means to be Native, they can't imagine American Indians in the modern world, said Julie Reed, a history professor at the University of Tennessee. 'Even when I'm standing in front of students, identified as a Cherokee professor, making the point from Day 1 that I'm still here and other Cherokee people are still here, I still get midterm exams that talk about the complete annihilation of Indian peoples,' she said. Ganteaume said that while Native people have deep histories in other countries, the United States is more often fixated on using images of them. Side galleries expand on what's familiar to most Americans: the Trail of Tears, Pocahontas and the Battle of Little Bighorn. An orientation film on the invention of Thanksgiving starts with a once widely used television screen test featuring an Indian head and then questions the hoopla of the national holiday when America already had Independence Day. Eden Slone, a graduate student in museum studies in the Washington, D.C., area, said she was impressed by the exhibit's design and interactive touch tables. She never realized that Tootsie Pop wrappers featured an image of an American Indian in a headdress, holding a bow and arrow. 'I think the exhibition was carried out well and it definitely makes you think of Native American imagery,' she said. 'When I see images like that, I'll think more about where it came from.' Reed, University of Tennessee professor and Cherokee woman, fears people will get the wrong impression about the Indian Removal Act from the website. An essay puts a positive spin on what Reed calls ethnic cleansing. Yet, she plans to visit. 'I think there is legitimacy to say, come look at this exhibit. That's a fair response to criticism,' Reed said. 'I want to go and give the exhibit a fair shake because it may be brilliant and could do everything the website does not.
  • London Fashion Week saw a flurry of shows Monday emphasizing romance and femininity, often with exquisite workmanship and dashes of mystery and drama. Dresses dominated the runway. Christopher Kane offered a strong collection of very feminine, sometimes very revealing dresses at his catwalk show at the Tate Britain museum. Canada-born designer Erdem Moralioglu turned the National Portrait Gallery into a showcase for his contemporary designs, which featured long, elaborately made dresses, many with floral themes offset by black backgrounds. ___ CHRISTOPHER KANE CHANNELS 'THE JOY OF SEX' Kane went 'old school' for his London Fashion Week show with a collection that overtly referenced two 70s' classics: 'The Joy of Sex' and 'More Joy of Sex' books. 'I have never shied away from sex in the collections and this one is no different,' said Kane. 'Since the beginning, I have found it fundamental to our idea of women. Women with their own power who create their own worlds.' Anyone who missed the point was reminded by the none-too-subtle voiceover on the soundtrack encouraging people to experience more joy, more play and more sex. Many of Kane's dresses were semi-sheer and lacy, in simple but effective blacks and reds, along with some relatively demure knitwear, including an impressive deep purple dress. Kane made very effective use of black set off with silver, as well as primarily black outfits that seemed to shimmer with color. Pants were sometimes ripped or had fabric cut out and some blouses and dresses sported horizontal 'peekaboo' slits. Kane used a wide variety of materials, including cotton canvas coats, raw wools and crushed velvet. ___ FALSE ALARM AT TATE SENDS MODELS INTO DRIZZLY RAIN There was an unexpected evacuation of the Tate Britain Museum several hours before the Christopher Kane show, sending visitors — and models — into a light rain outside while a fire alarm was checked. The models were rained on for about 20 minutes before the alarm was lifted, creating some challenges for makeup artists and stylists preparing for Kane's showcase event. ___ ERDEM BUILDS ON A DELICATE, VEILED THEME Erdem's London Fashion Week show made heavy use of veils — and black veil material — not only to shade the faces of many models but also as the fabric for leggings, long gloves and some shawls and capes. The veil material was detailed with black polka dots that became a design motif throughout the show, giving the models an unearthly and sometimes off-putting look when their faces were totally obscured. A few outfits had retro flair, including some silver metallic skirts that evoked the flapper era, and some fused Asian designs that gave the show an international feel. Colors were rich and vibrant and the floral designs were complex and evocative. The show, with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour in her customary front-row seat, showed a remarkably uniform approach to design, each piece reinforcing and building on the look. ___ GLAMOUROUS NIGHT AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE Prince William's wife, Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, co-hosted a fashion reception at Buckingham Palace with Sophie, the Countess of Wessex and wife of Prince Edward, William's uncle. The two were acting on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II at the glittery event. Among the guests Monday night were model Naomi Campbell, designer Stella McCartney and Edward Enninful, the new editor of British Vogue. The event was a celebration of the Commonwealth Fashion Exchange, launched earlier this month to foster partnerships between established and emerging talents in the Commonwealth countries ahead of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London in April. ___ BLAST FROM THE PAST: PAULINA PORIZKOVA RETURNS Almost overlooked in the flood of attention paid to Christopher Bailey's farewell show at Burberry was the return of Czech-born Paulina Porizkova, one of the original supermodels. She made a rare catwalk appearance Saturday to support designer Jiri Kalfar.
  • French jazz violinist Didier Lockwood, whose eclectic career spanned more than four decades and the world's most prestigious festivals and concert halls, has died. He was 62. Lockwood's agent, Christophe Deghelt, said in a statement on Twitter that Lockwood died suddenly Sunday, a day after he performed in Paris. President Emmanuel Macron paid tribute Monday to the musician he called a 'friend and partner of the greatest' and said possessed 'influence, open-mindedness and immense musical talent' that will be missed. As a composer and an improviser while performing, Lockwood enjoyed crossing musical genres, from jazz-rock to classical. He was known for experimenting with different sounds on the electric violin. He's survived by his wife, French soprano Patricia Petibon, and three daughters.
  • All eyes were on Duchess Catherine over the weekend when she attended the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards, more commonly known as the BAFTA Awards. Kate Middleton, who is expecting her third child with the Duke of Cambridge, arrived at the Sunday event with Prince William. >> Read more trending news  Much like award shows in the United States, attendees at the London event were encouraged to wear all black in support of the #MeToo and #TimesUp initiatives at this year’s BAFTAs, which are the British equivalent to the Oscars.  Duchess Catherine opted for a green cap-sleeved gown and coordinating emerald accessories. She wore her hair down in her signature loose curls and carried a black clutch that matched her suede Prada heels. William wore a traditional black tuxedo for the evening. Related: Photos: BAFTA Film Awards 2018 red carpet The attire of the soon-to-be mom of three didn’t go unnoticed by Twitter users, who were quick to call her out for not supporting the movements by wearing black on the red carpet. Catherine is expected to stay away from making any public political statements as a member of the royal family, though she has supported women’s issues when discussing mental health and motherhood. “Nothing can really prepare you for you the sheer overwhelming experience of what it means to become a mother,” she said last year while introducing a film documentary on mental health and parenthood.  “It is full of complex emotions of joy, exhaustion, love and worry, all mixed together. Your fundamental identity changes overnight,” she said. “You go from thinking of yourself as primarily an individual, to suddenly being a mother, first and foremost.” Margot Robbie, Selma Hayek and Jennifer Lawrence were among the stars who wore black at this year’s awards show.
  • The ferocious female-led tragi-comedy 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' was the big winner at the British Academy Film Awards in London, where women demanding an end to harassment, abuse and inequality dominated the ceremony. Martin McDonagh's film about a bereaved mother seeking justice won five trophies Sunday including best film, outstanding British film and best actress, for Frances McDormand. Producer Graham Broadbent said the movie is 'the story of a woman taking on the establishment and status quo.' 'It seems more timely now than we could ever have imagined,' he said. Writer-director McDonagh said it was fitting, in the year of the 'Time's Up' campaign against sexual harassment, that 'Three Billboards' is 'a film about a woman who refuses to take any s(asterisk)(asterisk)(asterisk) anymore.' 'Our film is a hopeful one in lots of ways, but it's also an angry one,' McDonagh said. 'As we've seen this year, sometimes anger is the only way to get people to listen and to change.' McDonagh won the original screenplay prize for 'Three Billboards,' which also netted Sam Rockwell the supporting actor trophy. Allison Janney was named best supporting actress for playing ice skater Tonya Harding's domineering mother in 'I, Tonya.' Guillermo del Toro won the directing prize for the monster fantasy 'The Shape of Water,' which also took trophies for music and production design. Gary Oldman, the favorite among bookies, won the best actor prize for playing wartime British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 'Darkest Hour.' The British prizes, known as BAFTAs, are considered a key indicator of likely success at Hollywood's Oscars in two weeks' time. The film awards season in the United States and elsewhere has been overshadowed by the allegations of sexual harassment and abuse leveled at scores of entertainment figures since women began coming forward to accuse Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein last year. London's Old Vic Theatre has been rocked by allegations against former artistic director Kevin Spacey. London police are also investigating nine claims of sexual assault by Weinstein. The red carpet and the auditorium at London's Royal Albert Hall were a sea of black, as actresses such as Lupita Nyong'o, Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Lawrence and Margot Robbie eschewed color as a statement against sexual misconduct and gender inequality. Several actresses brought feminist activists as guests, and men showed solidarity with 'Time's Up' lapel pins. McDormand opted to wear black and red rather than all black, and noted: 'I have a little trouble with compliance.' 'But I want you to know that I stand in full solidarity with my sisters tonight in black,' she said. On the red carpet, actress Andrea Riseborough, who brought U.K. Black Pride founder Phyll Opoku-Gyimah as her guest, said she also hoped the film industry was on the road to greater equality and diversity. 'It's more likely we'll see an alien onscreen than we'll see an Asian woman at the moment, which is disgraceful,' Riseborough said. Prince William — the British Academy's president — and the Duchess of Cambridge were guests of honor at Sunday's ceremony, hosted by 'Absolutely Fabulous' star Joanna Lumley. Kate acknowledged the evening's muted fashion by wearing a dark green Jenny Packham dress with black belt. The call to wear black put Kate in a delicate position, because the royal family is careful to avoid political statements. Ahead of the ceremony, almost 200 British women in entertainment called Sunday for an international movement to end sexual misconduct. Kate Winslet, Emma Thompson, Naomie Harris, Emma Watson and Gemma Arterton were among signatories to a letter saying that 2018 should be 'the year that time was up on sexual harassment and abuse.' The stars called for an end to impunity for abusers and announced a fund to support women and men battling workplace abuse, modeled on the 'Time's Up' movement in the U.S. Former 'Harry Potter' star Watson has given the fund 1 million pounds ($1.4 million), according to its page on the Go Fund Me website. The BAFTA ceremony honored several generations of talent. Filmmaker James Ivory, 89, took the adapted screenplay prize for 'Call Me By Your Name.' The 80-year-old director Ridley Scott, whose films include 'Blade Runner,' ''Alien,' ''Thelma and Louise' and 'Gladiator,' received the academy's highest honor, the BAFTA Fellowship. Daniel Kaluuya, the 28-year-old British star of 'Get Out,' won the rising star award and made a plea for public arts funding, which helped him get his start. Kaluuya, who is also Oscar-nominated, joked that success to him meant taking Ubers rather than the subway. 'I get that Prius everywhere,' he said. ___ For full coverage of awards season: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason