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    The Latest on a retracted CNN story about a supposed investigation in a Donald Trump associated and the head of a Russian investment fund (all times local): 8 p.m. CNN says it has accepted the resignations of three employees involved in a retracted story about a supposed investigation into a pre-inaugural meeting between an associate of President Donald Trump and the head of a Russian investment fund. The story was posted Thursday on CNN's website. It was retracted the next night, and CNN apologized to Anthony Scaramucci, the Trump transition team member named in the story. CNN said the story didn't meet its editorial standards. A network executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to discuss personnel issues, said Monday that story author Thomas Frank resigned. Also losing their jobs are Eric Lichtblau, an assistant managing editor at the organization's Washington bureau, and Lex Harris, head of the investigations unit. ___ 10:50 a.m. CNN wasn't saying Monday what led it to retract a story about a supposed investigation into a pre-inaugural meeting between an associate of President Donald Trump and the head of a Russian investment fund. The story posted Thursday on CNN's website said Senate investigators are looking into the meeting between Anthony Scaramucci, a member of Trump's transition team, and Kirill Dmitriev, whose Russian Direct Investment Fund guides investments by U.S. entities in Russia. Scaramucci, in the story, said he exchanged pleasantries in a restaurant with Dmitriev. On Friday night, CNN removed the story, saying it did not meet the news organization's standards. CNN apologized to Scaramucci. It was unclear whether the story by reporter Thomas Frank appeared on any of CNN's television networks.
  • Wisconsin attorneys asked a federal appeals court Monday to keep an inmate featured in the Netxflix series 'Making a Murderer' behind bars while they fight a second ruling overturning his conviction. The state Department of Justice's filing argues Brendan Dassey should remain in prison because his case is far from settled. The agency will appeal the ruling to the full 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals within the next two weeks, has the right to seek review in the U.S. Supreme Court or could retry him, the filing said. A Wisconsin jury also found Dassey guilty of 'heinous crimes,' which points to keeping him locked up, the filing added. 'Dassey's release pending full resolution of this appeal would harm the public interest, as he has been convicted of rape, murder, and mutilation of a corpse, thereby establishing his dangerousness to the public,' the filing said. Dassey's attorneys, Laura Nirider and Robert Dvorek, didn't immediately respond to email messages seeking comment. Dassey told detectives that he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill photographer Teresa Halbach at the Avery family's salvage yard in eastern Wisconsin's Manitowoc County on Halloween 2005. A jury in 2007 convicted him of first-degree intentional homicide, mutilating a corpse and second-degree sexual assault. He was sentenced to life. Avery was sentenced to life as well in a separate trial. A federal magistrate judge overturned Dassey's conviction in August 2016, finding his confession was coerced. Investigators took advantage of his below-average intelligence and his age — he was 16 when Halbach died — to obtain his statements, the judge found. He has remained behind bars while the state Department of Justice appealed. A three-judge panel from the 7th Circuit ruled 2-1 Thursday that the confession was indeed coerced. Dassey's attorneys asked the court to release him immediately. They contend that he's now 27 and keeping him locked up while state attorneys continue to appeal could cost him more months or even years. Dassey and Avery have long maintained police framed them. Their cases burst into the national consciousness after the 'Making a Murderer' series debuted in December 2015. The filmmakers cast doubt on the legal process in the cases, sparking widespread speculation about their innocence. Both men have accumulated thousands of fans on social media. Authorities who worked the cases insist the documentary was biased. Prosecutor Ken Kratz wrote in his book 'Avery' that Dassey was 'a shuffling, mumbling young man with bad skin and broken-bowl haircut' who could have rescued Halbach but instead involved himself in her rape and murder. Avery, he wrote, is 'by any measure of the evidence, stone guilty.' Avery is pursuing his own appeal. ___ Follow Todd Richmond on Twitter at https://twitter.com/trichmond1
  • A legendary recording studio in Detroit that once welcomed artists such as Aretha Franklin and Miles Davis has received a historic marker just four years after being targeted for demolition. United Sound Systems installed the approximately $5,000 sign last week after the Detroit Sound Conservancy helped it acquire a historic designation, MLive (http://bit.ly/2sKbOvZ ) reported. The studio was founded by Italian violinist and recording engineer James 'Jimmie' Siracuse and holds bragging rights over the first single for Tamla Records — the label that would later become Barry Gordy's Motown Records. But it shuttered its doors in the mid-2000s, and the building was targeted for demolition in 2013 under a plan to widen I-94. Federal authorities sought to seize the property last year. Court records show that investigators believe it was purchased in 2009 with money from cocaine trafficking. A trial for Dwayne Richards, who authorities say bankrolled the building's purchase for $20,000, is set for October. State transportation authorities have backed off from demolition plans. Detroit Sound Conservancy works to protect Detroit's sonic history by hosting club and studio tours, preserving old recordings and restoring artifacts important to the Motor City music scene. Conservancy founder Carleton Gholz said the studio's story is not only a tale of great entertainment but also the narrative of two unique Detroit entrepreneurs. 'One was an Italian immigrant living the American dream, and the other was an African American Detroiter living the American dream,' Gholz said. 'I would honestly say that a lot of people don't know (the history of United Sound Systems). That's our role at the DSC, to explore how deep all this stuff is. We can't take that for granted.
  • A spokeswoman for Bill Cosby is clarifying the purpose of the comedian's planned town hall meetings after she and a colleague initially appeared to draw a link between the meetings and his mistrial on felony charges of sexual assault. 'I just want to be clear,' Ebonee Benson told CNN. 'The town hall meetings are not about sexual assault. I will repeat: These town hall meetings are not about sexual assault.' The town halls are aimed at restoring Cosby's legacy, and that's what she and fellow Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt meant to say during an Alabama TV station interview last week. Cosby was tried on charges stemming from an encounter with former Temple University worker Andrea Constand, who alleged that Cosby drugged and molested her in 2004. Cosby, 79, contends the encounter was consensual. In last Wednesday's interview with Birmingham station WBRC, Wyatt said: 'We'll talk to young people. Because this is bigger than Bill Cosby. You know, this, this issue can affect any young person, especially young athletes of today. 'And they need to know what they're facing when they're hanging out and partying, when they're doing certain things they shouldn't be doing,' he said, adding, 'And it also affects married men.' Benson, who had read comments from Cosby's wife, Camille, slamming prosecutors after the trial ended with a hung jury, said in that WBRC interview that people need to be aware of changing laws regarding sexual assault, including on statute of limitations. Their interview resulted in an outcry over the plans for the town halls. Neither she nor Wyatt responded to a request for comment from The Associated Press on Monday. But on CNN Sunday, Benson blamed media reports for triggering criticism of Cosby's town hall plans, including from anti-sexual violence groups who suggested he was being hypocritical. Instead of sexual assault, Benson said, 'it is about continuing on with what Mr. Cosby started 50 years ago when he began in the entertainment business, which is the importance of community, importance of education.' Prosecutors have said Cosby will be retried on sexual assault charges, but Wyatt said Sunday he doubts there will be another trial, pointing to the deadlocked jury. The AP does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.
  • White House press secretary Sean Spicer's briefing with reporters turned testy on Monday, with CNN's Jim Acosta interrupting President Donald Trump's chief spokesman to demand he explain why television cameras were ordered off. Trump's relations with the media — never strong to begin with — have taken another sour turn with dwindling opportunities for on-camera engagement with the president's representatives. The White House has appeared to adopt a communications strategy of dealing primarily with its base of supporters, as witnessed by Trump's two interviews in the past week with Fox News Channel's morning show, 'Fox & Friends.' Spicer has been one of the most visible media personalities of 2017, with his near-daily briefings at the beginning of the administration lampooned memorably on 'Saturday Night Live' by Melissa McCarthy. Lately, however, there's been less willingness to mix it up with reporters. Board members of the White House Correspondents Association met with Spicer on Monday and expressed the importance of Americans getting the chance to question leaders. 'We believe it is in the interest of transparency to have regular televised briefings,' said Jeff Mason, a Reuters correspondent and president of the White House reporters' group. 'We aren't satisfied with the current situation and won't be until it changes.' Shortly after the meeting, Spicer held an off-camera briefing. Television networks were allowed to record audio, but not air it live. When a reporter noted there had been a 'drastic shift' in the briefings starting around the time of Trump's foreign trip in late May, Spicer said 'We'll continue to mix things up.' Spicer's answer prompted Acosta, CNN's senior White House correspondent, to interrupt and demand that Spicer 'tell us why you turned the cameras off.' Acosta had interrupted a reporter earlier in the briefing with a similar outburst. 'Why are they off, Sean?' Acosta said. 'You are a taxpayer-funded spokesman for the United States government. Could you at least give us an explanation as to why the cameras are off?' Spicer said 'some days we'll have them' on camera, some days not. 'The president's going to speak today in the Rose Garden. I want the president's voice to carry the day,' he said, referring to scheduled statements later Monday from Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Trump was not scheduled to take questions during the garden appearance with Modi. 'This is nothing inconsistent with what we've said since Day One,' Spicer added. NBC News' Lester Holt conducted the last non-Fox television interview with Trump on May 11. This past week, he gave interviews to Ainsley Earhardt and Pete Hegseth of 'Fox & Friends,' a talk show so friendly to the president that CNN media reporter Brian Stelter described it as a Trump 'infomercial.' Hegseth, in his interview over the weekend, asked Trump, 'Who's been your biggest opponent? Has it been Democrats resisting? Has it been the fake news media? Has it been deep state leaks?' He asked 'how frustrating is it to have former President Obama out there, leading the resistance?' It was an apparent reference to a social media message the former president sent out in support of his health care law. In Earhardt's interview, she discussed Trump's admission that he did not tape conversations with former FBI Director James Comey, despite earlier suggesting that there might be tapes. Raising the idea that Comey may have been taped in the White House 'was a smart way to make sure he stayed honest in those (congressional) hearings,' she said. 'Well,' Trump replied, 'it wasn't very stupid, I can tell you that.' ____ AP White House correspondent Darlene Superville in Washington contributed to this report.
  • CNN accepted the resignations Monday of three journalists involved in a retracted story about a supposed investigation into a pre-inaugural meeting between an associate of President Donald Trump and the head of a Russian investment fund. The story was posted on the network's website on Thursday and was removed, with all links disabled, Friday night. CNN immediately apologized to Anthony Scaramucci, the Trump transition team member who was reported to be involved in the meeting. The story's author, Thomas Frank, was among those who resigned, according to a network executive who requested anonymity because the person was not authorized to discuss personnel issues. Also losing their jobs were Eric Lichtblau, an assistant managing editor in CNN's Washington bureau, and Lex Harris, head of the investigations unit. CNN, in initially taking down the story, said it didn't meet its editorial standards. The episode is a damaging blow for a network that Trump has frequently derided as 'fake news,' and for a story that never even made it onto any of CNN's television networks. The story had been quickly questioned both internally and externally, including by the conservative site Breitbart News. It was determined that the story was posted without going through the expected checks and balances for a story of such sensitivity, the executive said. The failure to follow proper procedures is what led to the resignations, the CNN executive said. It's not immediately clear what in the story is factually incorrect, or whether CNN will continue to report on the issue. The retracted story had said the Senate intelligence committee was looking into a January 16 discussion between Scaramucci and Kirill Dmitriev, whose Russian Direct Investment Fund guides investments by U.S. entities in Russia. Scaramucci, in the story, said he exchanged pleasantries in a restaurant with Dmitriev. The report also said that two Democratic senators wanted to know whether Scaramucci had indicated in the meeting whether sanctions against Russia would be lifted, a decision that could impact the investment fund. Following the retraction, Scaramucci tweeted that CNN 'did the right thing. Classy move. Apology accepted. Everyone makes mistakes. Moving on.' ___ This story has been amended to correct congressional committee's name to Senate intelligence committee.
  • A Maine museum is playing host this summer to a traveling collection of pirate artifacts discovered by an underwater explorer trying to shake off criticism that cast him as a reckless treasure hunter. The 'Real Pirates' exhibit brings authentic pirate booty from the ship of Black Sam Bellamy to the Portland Science Center. The wreck of Bellamy's Whydah was discovered by Barry Clifford in 1984. Some of Clifford's more recent claims, including the purported discovery of Christopher Columbus' Santa Maria, have been disputed by a United Nations agency. The agency says Clifford's methods are unscientific and have damaged shipwreck sites. But Clifford attributes the criticism to 'politics' and defends his work. He told the Portland Press Herald (http://bit.ly/2tcv46r ) he has conserved his findings and never sold an artifact for profit.
  • A Spanish judge on Monday ordered the remains of artist Salvador Dali to be exhumed to settle a paternity suit, despite opposition from the state-run foundation that manages the artist's estate. Dali, considered one of the fathers of surrealist art, died in 1989 and is buried in his museum in the northeastern town of Figueres. Pilar Abel, a tarot-card reader from the nearby city of Girona who was born in 1956, says she is the offspring of an affair between Dali and her mother, Antonia. At the time of the alleged affair, Dali was married to his muse, Gala, who died seven years before the painter. Gala had a daughter from an earlier marriage but the couple had no children of their own. Upon his death, at age 84, Dali bestowed his estate to the Spanish state. On Monday, a Madrid court statement said that tests with DNA from Dali's embalmed body were necessary because there were no other existing biological remains with which to make a genetic comparison. Abel's court litigation started in 2015 when she sued the Ministry of Finance, as the trustee of Dali's estate, and the Gala Dali Foundation that was created to administer it. 'What she wants is to have a result of the tests with full guarantee in order to finish with this as soon as possible,' Abel's lawyer Enrique Blanquez told The Associated Press. If there's a match, Abel could use Dali as her surname and pursue further legal action to claim her rights over the artist's work and property, which according to regional laws could amount to 25 percent of all of the estate. The Gala Dali Foundation will appeal Monday's decision, foundation spokeswoman Imma Parada said in an e-mailed statement. But according to Blanquez, the appeal could not immediately stop the exhuming of Dali's remains. The first hearing in the case is scheduled for Sept. 18, the lawyer said. __ AP writer Ciaran Giles contributed to this story.
  • Wizarding legend Harry Potter's tale has turned 20. Author J.K. Rowling's first novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, was published in Britain on June 26, 1997. Since then, it has sold more than 450 million copies worldwide and has been translated into 79 languages. The books' magical world has inspired multiple films, spinoffs, memorabilia and amusement park attractions. The White Elephant Cafe, the Edinburgh spot where Rowling wrote the first book, has become an international tourist destination. '20 years ago today a world that I had lived in alone was suddenly open to others,' Rowling tweeted. 'It's been wonderful. Thank you.' Rowling's publisher, Bloomsbury, will release four new editions of the book, one for each house at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry, in honor of the anniversary.
  • Imbolo Mbue, whose debut novel 'Behold the Dreamers' is Oprah Winfrey's latest selection, owes her career in part to the talk-show host. 'Years ago, I went to the library one day in Falls Church, Virginia, to borrow a book and saw a shelf that only had Oprah book club picks,' Mbue, 36, told The Associated Press during a recent telephone interview. 'And one of the books that caught my eye was Toni Morrison's 'Song of Solomon.' And after reading it, I was very much in awe of it (and) thought maybe I would try writing, too.' Mbue's 'Behold the Dreamers' was published in 2016 and won the PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction, an honor previously given to Philip Roth and Ann Patchett, among others. The book tells of an immigrant from Cameroon who becomes the chauffeur for a Lehman Brothers executive not long before the 2008 financial crisis. In Monday's announcement to The Associated Press, made jointly by Winfrey's OWN network and 'O'' magazine, Winfrey said 'Behold the Dreamers' was both topical and timeless. 'It's about race and class, the economy, culture, immigration and the danger of the Us vs. Them mentality,' she said in a video. 'And underneath it all comes the heart and soul of family, love, the pursuit of happiness and what home really means.' Winfrey has championed other debut works in recent years, including Ayana Mathis' 'The Twelve Tribes of Hattie' and Cynthia Bond's 'Ruby.' She began her club in 1996 and has helped dozens of books become best-sellers. Last year, she provided a major boost to Colson Whitehead's 'The Underground Railroad,' which went on to receive the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. Within hours of Monday's announcement, 'Behold the Dreamers' had jumped from No. 2,493 to No. 6 on Amazon.com's best-seller list. Mbue's novel was partly based on personal experience. A native of Cameroon, Mbue is a New York City resident who lost her job working in a media marketing department after the crash and wondered how others managed, including the drivers she saw parked in front of the Time Warner Center in midtown Manhattan. Mbue has remained a fan of Winfrey's club, reading such selections as Barbara Kingsolver's 'The Poisonwood Bible' and Jeffrey Eugenides' 'Middlesex,' while never imagining she would be invited to the inner circle. When Mbue was told this spring that she would be hearing from someone at 'O'' magazine, she assumed they wanted her to review a book. 'And then the phone rings and I hear, 'Hi, Imbolo, it's Oprah,' and she said my book was her next selection,' Mbue recalled. 'And I really lost it. I was screaming, 'Oh my god! Oh my god! Oh my god!'