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    And it's been a sudden and ugly death for the ill-fated Fyre Festival, a multiday music, art and culture party that promised 'an invitation to let loose and unplug with the likeminded' on the Bahamian island of Exuma. The festival's rise and fall has played out in real time on YouTube and filtered through Facebook, where would-be party goers are putting their anger on display. Instead of photos of boozy good times, people have posted pictures of rows of white tents that look like 'Stormtrooper helmets,' blue port-a-potties near half-constructed plywood structures and limp, lifeless cheese sandwiches. Organizers canceled the event at the last minute after poor planning, disorganization and lack of accommodations. Most of the A-list acts had pulled out days before, saying they hadn't been paid. It was supposed to be a sun-soaked experience filled with yachts, gourmet food and models. Ticket prices ranged from $500 to $12,000. But by Saturday morning, the partygoers had decamped, many of them to hotels in Miami in hopes of salvaging a weekend. People decried the festival accommodations as being like a 'disaster tent city' and a 'refugee camp.' The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism says it's deeply disappointed. 'Hundreds of visitors to Exuma were met with total disorganization and chaos,' the tourism office wrote in a statement to the media. Fyre Festival co-organizer Billy McFarland promised full refunds on the festival's website Saturday. 'We will be working on refunds over the next few days and will be in touch directly with guests with more details. Also, all guests from this year will have free VIP passes to next year's festival,' he wrote. The hype began months ago, marketed with slick videos on social media. 'I saw it on Instagram and booked it before the lineup was announced,' said Mitch Purgason, a 25-year-old bespoke menswear designer in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Instagram ads looked especially 'ridiculous' — parlance for amazing — what with models like Gigi Hadid and rapper Ja Rule. Blink-182 was supposed to perform. Photos of the impossibly blue water and the sugary sandy beach looked incredible. What's more: Wild, docile pigs lived on the beach and swam in the warm water, perfect props for a killer Instagram selfie. Although the festival on the island chain east of Florida appeared to cater to the Millennial trust fund crowd, it was people like Purgason and 29-year-old Jake Strang of Pittsburgh who purchased early tickets — young professionals who wanted to spend a fun weekend in the tropics. Both men paid $500 for a flight from Miami to the island along with lodging and food. Strang and seven of his friends planned the trip to coincide with a birthday. They reserved a 'lodge' for eight, with four king beds and a seating area in the middle. 'Everything made it look amazing,' said Strang. The festival website promised a treasure hunt of 'exceptional proportions,' with more than $1 million in riches to be found on a private island. Purgason said he was skeptical, but planned the vacation anyway. 'Worst case scenario, I figured, we're still in the Bahamas in a villa.' His first inkling something was amiss came on Thursday morning, after the first flight from Miami to Exuma. Organizers said the villas weren't ready, so they whisked the planeload of partygoers to a restaurant at a nearby resort. It wasn't a private island at all, but food and drink were free and plenty. Cute pigs and bikini-clad girls roamed the beach. There was a DJ. 'They actually treated us pretty well,' he said. 'The first three hours was dope.' Jenna Conlin, 30, an advertising professional from Venice, California, said, 'They were putting down bottles of tequila on every table in an attempt to make everybody happy.' Strang flew in later Thursday and wasn't so lucky. 'When we arrived, it essentially looked like a construction site. It looked like they were trying to sell lots for homes,' he said. A promoter told festival goers to find tents and waved his arm in a direction. But the tents had holes that had obviously allowed rain to come in, because the beds were wet. They were given a Styrofoam container of food: 'two slices of ham, lettuce and one slice of cheese on soggy bread,' Strang said. A few lucky patrons had been relocated to resorts. Most had to find beds in the tents. Available rooms aren't easy to grab on Exuma, a small island with a population of about 7,000 that lacks the well-developed tourist infrastructure of Nassau or Freeport. The island's hotels were already booked months in advance for a well-known regatta, wrote Robert Carron, owner of the Bahamas Tribune newspaper. By daybreak, people were already lining up to complain, and buses began returning them to the airport. Soon, it was official: The festival was cancelled. Word got out via social media that organizers said 'circumstances out of our control' prevented them from preparing the 'physical infrastructure' necessary for the event on the largely undeveloped island. 'I'm heartbroken at this moment,' Ja Rule, whose real name is Jeffrey Atkins, said on Twitter. 'I wanted this to be an amazing event. It was not a scam as everyone is reporting. I truly apologize as this is NOT MY FAULT.' ___ Follow Tamara Lush on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tamaralush
  • The Latest on a hacker releasing stolen copies of a Netflix series(all times local): 11:35 a.m. A hacker claims to have followed through on a threat to release several episodes from the upcoming season of Netflix's hit series 'Orange Is The New Black.' The hacker, which goes by the name The Dark Overlord, announced the move on Twitter early Saturday. The post included a link to an illegal file-sharing service where purportedly 10 episodes from the series' upcoming fifth season were available for download. The Associated Press could not legally confirm the authenticity of the uploaded files. New episodes of 'Orange' are scheduled for official release on June 9. Netflix did not immediately return a call seeking comment Saturday. The hacker had been demanding that the video streaming service pay an unspecified ransom in exchange for not releasing the episodes prematurely online. ___ 6:28 a.m. A hacker claims to have stolen the upcoming season of Netflix's hit series 'Orange Is The New Black,' and is demanding that the video streaming service pay an unspecified ransom to prevent all the new episodes from being prematurely released online. The hacker, operating under the name The Dark Overlord, has already purportedly uploaded the first episode to an illegal file-sharing service. The Associated Press could not legally confirm the authenticity of that uploaded file. New episodes of 'Orange' are scheduled for official release on June 9. Netflix said that a small production vendor that works with several major TV studios had suffered a breach. The Los Gatos, California, company described it as an 'active situation' that's being investigated by the FBI and other authorities. Pirated copies of 'Orange' could dent Netflix's subscriber growth and the company's stock price.
  • Prince Harry has joined thousands of rugby fans at a London stadium to cheer on the annual British armed forces rugby match. The 32-year-old prince, a former Army captain, was attending the 100th edition of the annual match between senior teams from the Army and the Royal Navy. Harry was at the match in his role as patron of the Invictus Games Foundation, the charity for this year's game. The royal has spearheaded the Invictus Games, an international sporting event for injured service personnel. Saturday's match at London's Twickenham Stadium was the final fixture in Britain's Inter Services rugby competition.
  • Turkey passed two new decrees Saturday — one that expelled more than 4,000 civil servants and another that banned television dating programs. The country's Official Gazette published the decrees Saturday evening. The first named thousands of civil servants to be dismissed, including nearly 500 academics and more than 1,000 Turkish military personnel. It also reinstated 236 people to their jobs. The second decree, among other things, banned radio and television programs for 'finding friends and spouses' by adding a clause to the article on protecting children in Turkey's media law. The shows will not be allowed to air without television content rating symbols. Dating programs, which draw high ratings and large ad revenues, have been a hot topic this year. Petitions have called for their bans and lawmakers across the political spectrum have criticized the programs as having a negative influence on families. Government spokesman Numan Kurtulmus has described them as contrary to Turkish customs and religion. The state of emergency that followed last summer's coup attempt has allowed the Turkish government to rule by decrees. Since then, more than 47,000 people have been arrested and 100,000 have been purged for alleged connections to terror organizations. Turkey says U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen orchestrated the coup attempt. He denies the allegations.
  • An Ohio family says they learned just 20 minutes before dinner this week that a planned mystery guest would be Facebook founder and billionaire Mark Zuckerberg. The Vindicator of Youngstown reports (http://bit.ly/2oSVBQ3 ) Zuckerberg dined Friday with the Moore family in Newton Falls, about 55 miles (89 kilometers) southeast of Cleveland. The newspaper reports Zuckerberg had asked his staff to find Democrats who voted for President Donald Trump. Not all the dinner chat was political. Daniel Moore says he and his wife, Lisa, talked about their work with an orphanage in Uganda and that Zuckerberg says he's now planning a fundraiser to benefit the orphans. Zuckerberg's project, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, says he visited Youngstown's Eastern Gateway Community College Friday and met with people recovering from opioid addiction in Dayton Saturday. He has challenged himself to visit people in all 50 states. ___ Information from: The Vindicator, http://www.vindy.com
  • Washington's once-glitzy 'nerd prom' was briefly upstaged Saturday as comedians and Hollywood stars gathered for jokes and jests about President Donald Trump for a tongue-in-cheek event to counter the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner. Late-night TV star Samantha Bee pulled in celebrities for the first 'Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner': Alysia Reiner of 'Orange Is the New Black,' Retta of 'Parks and Recreation' and Matt Walsh of 'Veep.' Bee's show, a comedic tribute to American news organizations, featured actor Will Ferrell and other guests roasting Trump and his allies. The star power of the real correspondents' dinner took a hit this year when Trump declined to attend, the first president since Ronald Reagan in 1981 to skip it. In Reagan's case, he was recovering from an assassination attempt. Trump did his own counter-programming, scheduling a rally Saturday night in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to mark his 100th day in office. The absence of the president himself at the WHCA dinner or even officials from the administration seemed to diminish attendance by big names in film, television and sports. Barack Obama's humorous remarks had become a highlight at the dinner. Last year, for Obama's final appearance, the crowd included Will Smith, Emma Watson, Kerry Washington, Helen Mirren and model Kendall Jenner. For years, the event offered Washington's press corps an opportunity to wear black tie and stunning gowns while mixing with celebrities. With Trump out, organizers put the focus on the First Amendment and the role of the press in democracy. The scheduled headliners were Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, set to present journalism awards. Woodward told The Washington Post the two planned to speak about 'the First Amendment and the importance of aggressive but fair reporting.' The dinner still booked a master of ceremonies: Hasan Minhaj of 'The Daily Show.' Broadcast coverage was to begin at 9:30 p.m. on C-SPAN, followed by Bee's event airing on TBS at 10 p.m. Jeff Mason, the WHCA president, said this year would have been different even if Trump had attended, 'based on the tension that has existed in the relationship and some of the things he has said about the press. We were preparing for a different dinner either way.' Trump has called the media 'fake' and 'dishonest' and even 'the enemy of the people.' In an emailed fundraising appeal before leaving for Pennsylvania, Trump cited among the accomplishments over his first 100 days, 'We fought back against the media's lies.' Mason promised that Minhaj would use his comedy chops, without 'roasting the president in absentia.' 'People don't want to come to a dinner and feel bored or preached at. Hopefully neither of those things will happen,' Mason said. Bee, who hosts TBS' weekly show 'Full Frontal,' said she cared deeply about the press. 'For God's sake, we could not do our show if things were more restricted. So, boy, nobody needs press freedom more than we do,' she told The Associated Press in an interview. Bee's taped show singled out the Committee to Protect Journalists, the nonprofit group that will receive proceeds from the show. The show humorously assailed topics like 'alternative facts,' a remark once made by Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway that drew heavy criticism. The official WHCA dinner began in 1921. Most people trace the development of the celebrity guests to 1987, when Baltimore Sun reporter Michael Kelly brought Fawn Hall, the secretary at the center of the Iran-Contra affair. ___ Associated Press writer Jocelyn Noveck contributed to this report. Follow Jack Gillum on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jackgillum .
  • The Latest on the White House Correspondents' Association dinner and the competing event organized by late-night TV star Samantha Bee (all times EDT): 6:35 p.m. There's a thinner presence of celebrities and other famous faces at this year's White House Correspondents' Association dinner. Saturday evening's red carpet featured boldface names largely from the world of journalism and government. Among the guests are longtime Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward and former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. The guests arrived at the Washington Hilton as President Donald Trump was on his way to his own competing rally-style event in Pennsylvania. He is the first president to skip the event in decades. With Trump's absence, WHCA dinner organizers say they're putting the focus on the First Amendment and the role of the press in a democracy. ___ 5:10 p.m. Washington's once-glitzy 'nerd prom' is being briefly upstaged as comedians and Hollywood stars gather for jokes and jests about President Donald Trump. The tongue-in-cheek event Saturday is a counter to the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner. Late-night TV star Samantha Bee pulled in celebrities for the first 'Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner.' Attending are Alysia Reiner of 'Orange Is the New Black,' Retta of 'Parks and Recreation' and Matt Walsh of 'Veep.' Bee's show is a comedic tribute to American news organizations, and features actor Will Ferrell and other guests roasting Trump and his allies. The star power of the real correspondents' dinner is taking a hit this year with Trump's absence. He's doing his own counter-programming, scheduling a rally Saturday night in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. ___ 2:50 p.m. On a sweltering Washington spring day, several TV stars who walked the red carpet to Samantha Bee's 'Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner' have homed in on a key reason they were there: To support freedom of the press. They say they feel press freedom has been under attack since President Donald Trump took office 100 days ago. Actor Matt Walsh played press secretary Mike McClintock on the HBO political comedy 'Veep.' He says: 'Administrations have been hostile to the media before. But this one is particularly isolating, or singling out, the retailers of media that they like' and trying to ignore those they don't. ___ 12:55 p.m. Comedian Samantha Bee says she feels 'the press is under assault' in the United States. The host of her namesake show on TBS says she's contributing proceeds from her 'Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner' event on Saturday to the Committee to Protect Journalists because it 'seemed very logical.' Bee tells The Associated Press in an interview: 'We're doing an event that celebrates the freedom of the press. We care deeply about it. For God's sake, we could not do our show if things were more restricted. So, boy, nobody needs press freedom more than we do.' Her event in Washington comes hours before the traditional White House Correspondents' Association dinner. She frequently targets President Donald Trump, but he's holding a rally Saturday instead of attending the WHCA dinner. ___ 11:25 a.m. Washington's most glitzy 'nerd prom' is about to get overshadowed. Late-night TV star Samantha Bee has organized the first 'Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner.' It's a tongue-in-cheek play off the annual event from the White House Correspondents' Association that's traditionally drawn the president, journalists and — in recent years — celebrities. But this year President Donald Trump is skipping the dinner on what is his 100th day in office. He'll be in Pennsylvania later Saturday for a rally. Bee's event is to air at 10 p.m. on TBS. That's just after C-SPAN is to begin coverage of the correspondents' dinner — where the master of ceremonies is comedian Hasan Minhaj of 'The Daily Show.' ___ 2:35 a.m. The annual gala dinner of the White House Correspondents' Association is taking place on Saturday night without its traditional star. President Donald Trump has decided to skip the event — where he'd be a prime target of biting humor. Instead, he's planning to be in Pennsylvania for a rally. In recent years, lots of celebrities have attended the dinner as guests of media outlets. That's not the case this year, and the gathering is focusing on the First Amendment and the crucial role of the press in democracy. There will be an entertainer as master of ceremonies: Hasan Minhaj of 'The Daily Show.' The last president to decline an invitation to the dinner was Ronald Reagan in 1981 — when he was recovering from an assassination attempt.
  • Performances by Maroon 5, the Alabama Shakes and Usher & The Roots brought crowd-pleasing rock, blues and R&B to the second day of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, while jazz clarinetist Pete Fountain earned a special place in the event's history. Fountain, a festival favorite who died Aug. 6 at the age of 86, was recognized Saturday with the unveiling of a larger-than-life hand-painted portrait in the ancestor area, memorializing those who have helped shape the festival since it began in 1970. 'Welcome back, Pete,' said Quint Davis, director and producer of the festival, as the portrait was unveiled. 'There's been Fats Domino. There has been Mahalia Jackson. There has been Louis Armstrong,' Davis said. 'There have been very few great, great men who have carried the banner of New Orleans around the world through music. And one of those men is Pete Fountain.' Kicking off with 'Lily of the Valley,' members of the Half Fast Marching Club, which Fountain founded, and the Storyville Stompers Brass Band led a second-line there from the Economy Hall Tent, where Fountain last performed in 2013. Two other 'ancestors' also are being honored this year. Gospel singer Jo 'Cool' Davis, who died Aug. 5, 2016, will be celebrated Sunday at 1:30 p.m. with an a cappella performance by The Zion Harmonizers. Zydeco musician Stanley 'Buckwheat' Dural Jr., who died Sept. 24, 2016, will be honored May 6 with a parade at 11:45 a.m. and a performance by Zydeco accordionist Nathan Williams Jr. NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune reports (http://bit.ly/2phR3Gl ) the wooden painting of Fountain was draped in gold. 'We want to thank you Quint for honoring Pete as an ancestor. He's here with some great friends,' said Benny Harrell, Fountain's son-in-law and longtime manager. Davis corrected Harrell warmly: 'Thank you Benny, but you've really got that backward. It's an honor for the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival to have been associated with Pete Fountain.' The seven-day festival takes place over two weekends. In addition to the big-name acts, the festival features hundreds of Louisiana jazz, gospel, zydeco and other musical acts. ___ Information from: The Times-Picayune, http://www.nola.com
  • The couple announced the birth of their daughter on Friday night while the NFL draft was taking place. Ciara posted to her Instagram account details of the birth. Sienna weighed 7 pounds, 13 ounces, according to the post. The couple married last summer in England and announced they were expecting their first child together during the fall. This is the 28-year-old Wilson's first child. Ciara has a young son from a previous relationship with rapper Future.
  • Bruce Springsteen and Tom Hanks paid tribute Friday night to the late director Jonathan Demme, the man who brought them together on his film 'Philadelphia,' which won each of them Oscars. 'God bless Jonathan Demme, we just lost him,' Hanks told the crowd attending an event that was part of the Tribeca Film Festival's Storyteller series. Demme, the Oscar-winning director of 'Silence of the Lambs,' died of cancer on Wednesday. Springsteen, who won an Oscar for best original song for 'Streets of Philadelphia,' called Demme 'inspirational.' Hanks, who won the best actor Academy Award for the 1993 film, played the role of fan during the hour-long session and questioned Springsteen about his life and early career. The actor also frequently engaged the crowd to finish the words to Springsteen hits such as 'Rosalita' and 'Growin' Up.' Springsteen entered to the loud deep chant of 'Bruuuuuce,' so common at the music star's concerts. 'Man, I can't believe they're booing you Bruce,' Hanks joked. Much of the conversation was based on stories Springsteen told in his recent memoir, 'Born to Run.' He discussed the tough times at the start of his career when he was broke and playing gigs wherever he could. He and his bandmates never paid taxes and avoided bills for years so when they hit it big, they spent years paying off debts and attorney fees. 'In 1980, I think I had about $20,000 to my name — which sounded like a lot of money when I was 20, but when you're 30 and you've been doing this for a while...,' Springsteen said, laughing. 'But most people's early careers are a mess. When you get in the music business, the cards are stacked in favor of the business and they're stacked against the musicians.' The rocker known as 'The Boss' became reflective when talking about making life off stage mean as much as his creative life. 'All artists at some point believe they can live within their art, and what you learn — either quickly or painfully and slowly — is that at the end of the day, it's just your job, it's just your work, and life awaits you outside of those things. Let the world happen to you.' Hanks ended the night by thanking Springsteen, on behalf of all fans. 'You make us happy that we were all born in the U.S.A. and will make us always want to keep our eyes out for the girls in their summer clothes. What you have done — more special for all of us — is that you have made us part of something greater than ourselves,' Hanks said. Among those in attendance Friday were Malia Obama, news anchor Gayle King, and Hanks' wife Rita Wilson and Springsteen's Patti Scialfa.