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I just won the lottery! What do I do?

Well, congratulations. We all hate you now.

Actually, let us correct that; we all love you now, more than you've ever been loved before. But we may all end up hating you, eventually. And that's probably the bigger crisis.

But first, the fundamentals.

Step one: Sign the lottery ticket and call the lottery office.

Now.

If there's a way to dispute ownership of that ticket, it's going to happen, everything from claims of a verbal agreement to splitting the winnings to outright theft. This is particularly likely if you both play in your office pool and buy tickets separately – a judge recently ruled that a lottery winner had to part with some of the winnings because it wasn't perfectly clear which tickets were his and which were in the office pool.

READ: Tips for navigating your kids' birthday party circuit

If you've identified a winning ticket, you need to get to lottery officials at once, so they can identify you. The physical piece of paper in your hand is like carrying around a multi-million dollar check. The risk of it being lost or stolen is too great to wait, particularly if you don't follow step two ...

Step two. Shut up.

There are six states that allow a lottery winner to remain anonymous: Kansas, Maryland, Delaware, Michigan, North Dakota and Ohio. Every other state requires a lottery winner to be announced publically, and many of those states prohibit the use of third parties to claim a prize. They want human beings waving a giant check in front of a camera.

But the one consistent strain in the tales told about lottery winners — both those who have truly prospered after hitting the jackpot and those who eventually fell to ruin — is that they suddenly and permanently become the focus of unwanted attention. Family members will come to them looking for relief from their own financial hardships. Religious groups will almost immediately ask you to share your blessings with the needs and the faithful. Charities you've never heard of will look to you to expand. And among these supplicants will be straight-up charlatans looking to exploit your lack of experience with wealth.

READ: Crisis Button: I'm being threatened with blackmail? What should I do?

Keep your win a secret for as long as you can. That's the universal advice from winners.

Step three. Call a lawyer and a certified financial planner.

When the inevitable requests for money begin pouring in, you're going to want to be able to deflect to someone who can politely say no. You're also probably going to want to set up trusts that can manage contributions to charity and to your dependents in a tax-efficient manner. This will require the help of anestate planning attorney and a certified financial planner.

(By the way, you are probably going to want to take the lump sum payment and not the annual award. We know, we know; but the annual payments are more money over time! They're not. Inflation and the likelihood of future tax increases on dividends and capital gains make the lump sum payment more valuable now. If you want to spread out the cash, fund an investment trust with the lump sum. You'll earn more.)

READ: Valuable tips on the future: How to manage your digital afterlife

The trusts are important, not just for tax and legal purposes, but because they put a decision-making layer between you and those demanding your help. This is not to say that you should sign over the right to control the money. Never do that: Sign nothing that grants someone else the power to make significant disbursements from your accounts without your signature. But once the money is securely in your bank account, your biggest problems aren't going to be financial any more. They're going to be about your relationships and your character. If you fail the tests of relationship and character, then you'll have financial problems again.

Many of the stories of lottery winners broken by their good fortune stem from radical changes in their lifestyle.

People buy giant mansions, oblivious to the carrying costs of the property. Or they buy fancy cars without understanding the higher maintenance costs. At least as common, people make large investments in legitimate-but-risky business ventures without fully understanding the likelihood of failure. Establishing relationships with trustworthy financial advisors is essential.

READ: What should I take into consideration before investing?

Step four. Hit the books.

Of course, it can be hard for a layperson to evaluate the trustworthiness and advice of one financial advisor over another. So … you need to stop being a layperson.

Resolve, now, before other financial commitments are made, to spend at least one year quietly learning the principles of financial management. Enroll in classes. Start reading Rich Dad Poor Dad and the like. Perhaps more importantly, you'll need to be able to tell people that you're not going to dig deep into the money you've won until you're confident that you can use it wisely. Reasonable people will understand your thinking … and unreasonable people will out themselves with their reaction.

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  • The Oklahoma Highway Patrol reports a drowning at Claremore Lake. The Hispanic male victim was fishing and went into the water around 8:30 p.m. Sunday and was never seen getting out of the lake. The victim's body has not been recovered or identified.
  • Almost everywhere I went this weekend and ran into someone I knew, there was one question asked by just about everyone – whether it was at the pool, on the golf course, or grilling burgers in my back yard – “Will the Republicans get their health care bill through the Senate this week?” Let’s take a look at what the GOP has to do to get that bill approved. 1. A test for the Senate Majority Leader.  The hamburgers had barely touched the grill on Sunday evening, when my father – a veteran of many legislative showdowns on Capitol Hill – asked whether I thought the GOP could get the health bill approved in the Senate by the end of the week. My answer is much like where we were with the House bill at the beginning of May – I can see the GOP passing this by the narrowest of margins, and I can also envision the bill getting delayed because of concerns among GOP Senators.  Remember, the House had a couple of false starts before finally mustering a majority for the Republican health plan. Senate Republicans face key week as more lawmakers waver in support for health-care bill — devcode88 (@devcode88) June 26, 2017 2. President Trump warming in the bullpen.  Just like he did when he cajoled reluctant Republicans in the House to get on board with a GOP health care plan, the White House has already had the President reaching out to GOP conservatives who aren’t quite sure they really want to vote for this overhaul of the Obama health law. Over the weekend, the President again made clear – that despite concerns over individual provisions in the bill, and how it might change health insurance options in the individual market – this is better than the current Obamacare situation. Expect to hear that argument a lot more this week from the White House. I cannot imagine that these very fine Republican Senators would allow the American people to suffer a broken ObamaCare any longer! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 24, 2017 3. There really is no role for Democrats. Just like in 2009 and 2010 as the Obama health law made its way through the House and Senate – when Republicans did not have the votes to leave their imprint on the bill – Democrats are simply on the sidelines, as they lob verbal grenades at the GOP on an hourly basis. It’s important to remember this week that Republicans have almost no margin for error, as just three GOP Senators could tip the balance of this debate if they refuse to back the Republican health bill. All Democrats can do is watch from the sidelines, and hope they have an impact. We got the Senate bill text on Thursday. This bill would overhaul our entire health care system but the GOP wants to vote next Thursday! — Dick Durbin (@DickDurbin) June 25, 2017 4. Have you read the bill? Why not? The GOP health bill is just 142 pages long – but even if you sit down to read it, I guarantee that most of you won’t be able to figure out what it says. Why? Well, that’s because it is basically an amendment to the underlying Obama health law, and if you don’t have that language on hand, you won’t really know what the Republicans are trying to change, and how. The original Affordable Care Act was well over 2,000 pages long – and the reason that this GOP bill is so short is simple – it just amends the Obama health law – this is not “repeal and replace” by any measure. Because it leaves most of Obamacare in place. https://t.co/8lnG9385JU — Bill Kristol (@BillKristol) June 25, 2017 5. The GOP Senators who might vote ‘No.’ If I had to list a group of Republicans to watch, my morning line would look this way: I WILL SAY THIS SENATOR IS OPPOSED TO THE BILL 1) Rand Paul – most likely to vote “No” at this point 2) Dean Heller – Nevada Senator said on Friday that there must be changes POSSIBLE NO VOTE 3) Mike Lee – said this weekend he thinks the bill doesn’t significantly reform health care. But I still wonder if he gets to “Yes” with some late changes. 4) Susan Collins – CBO report is important, plus Planned Parenthood. Still not sure she votes “No.” 5) Lisa Murkowski – Planned Parenthood & bill details important. Important one to watch. CONSERVATIVES ON THE FENCE 6) Ted Cruz – Yes, I know Cruz has said he has concerns. So did the Freedom Caucus in the House, but most of them ended up voting for the bill. 7) Ron Johnson – Same thought for the Wisconsin Republican as Cruz. Can’t see either of them being the 51st vote against the bill. 8) Bill Cassidy – No matter what he said to Jimmy Kimmel, I still think it is unlikely that Cassidy votes against the Senate bill. But we’ll see. Latest whip count on #SenateHealthCareBill: 45 yea 55 nay @GOP opposed: Paul, Cruz, Lee, Heller, Johnson, Cassidy, Collins. — KOMO Newsradio (@komonewsradio) June 25, 2017 Clearly, the GOP leadership – and the White House – has some legislative arm twisting to do in coming days. If this plan stays on track, it could well be voted through on Thursday or Friday.  And if that happens, I wouldn’t rule out the GOP thinking about bringing it right to the floor of the House for a final vote. But we’ll see if we actually get that far.  Stay tuned.  It will be a very interesting week in the halls of Congress.  
  • If you have outdoor plans for today, there will be no need to keep your eyes on the sky. National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Plate says conditions will remain pleasant throughout the day in the Tulsa area. “It should still be a pretty nice day,” Plate said.  “Partly cloud skies, with the high temperature in the upper 80s.  Relatively low humidity values and light winds.” The low Sunday night will be around 63 degrees. We’ll see more of the same to start the work week.  NWS reports sunny skies though Wednesday and highs will remain in the upper 80s.  
  • If you’re carrying trafficking amounts of drugs, it’s probably not a good idea to drive through a police barricade.   Rufus Newsome learned that lesson the hard way Saturday night, when he reportedly drove through a barricade at the Tulsa officer-involved shooting scene.  This happened around 9:35 p.m., near 3rd and Garnett.  Police say Newsome was driving at a high-rate of the speed after passing the barricade and could have hit multiple pedestrians.  Eventually, he stopped and tried his luck on foot.   “Caught the suspect and the suspect resisted by pulling his hands away,” police said.  “As he was in custody, he spit two times on (officer’s name redacted).” Officers recovered a trafficking amount of cocaine base.   Newsome has been booked into the Tulsa County Jail.  
  • A suspect is dead, following an officer-involved shooting Saturday night near 4th and Garnett. Tulsa police report a pursuit stopped in the area and a suspect tried to flee on foot.   KRMG’s told he ran to a home, tried to kick in the door and then reportedly pulled out a gun.  During this time, he was shot by officers.   Neighbors we spoke to were concerned because they weren't sure what had happened. “All of a sudden we heard the gunshots,” a witness said.  “We didn’t know what was going on.” So far, no names have been released. We do know the suspect was said to be riding in a stolen car. KRMG will update the story when more information comes into the newsroom.